How much will Sanders raise your taxes? A lot.

A new calculator from Vox.com and the Tax Policy Center helps you calculate how much the various presidential candidates will raise or lower your taxes.

For me, the biggest surprise was how much more in taxes most people will pay if Bernie Sanders’ proposals are enacted into law. In contrast, under Hillary Clinton’s plan, most people’s taxes won’t change by much.

Sanders supporters will tell you that the increase in taxes is illusory, as you’ll be paying much less for health insurance under a single-payer system, and you’ll be able to send your kids to state college for free. So these freebies offset the increase in taxes. And that may be true. Or it may not. We have no way of really knowing what will or won’t get passed into law, nor how it will play out in practice.

doctor health care obamacare

Doctor via Shutterstock.

We do know how much taxes will increase, and it’s a scary amount. And regardless of any explanations as to how it won’t really be “that” bad, the numbers are jarring.

When I entered into the calculator what I made last year, the increase in taxes under Sanders’ plan was nearly twice what I pay for insurance. And I don’t have any children, so I won’t save anything on college education. So for me at least, I won’t be saving anything, and I’ll be paying a lot more.

I ran the numbers on a few variations. Here they are. You can easily compare how much more you’d pay in taxes with what you currently pay for insurance per year, in order to see if you’d be better off or worse off. I did look up what the average single person and family pay for health insurance per year, for comparison sake.

average-insurance

According to that chart, and the data in the calculator, the average single person with an employer health plan is going to pay more for their insurance under Sander’s plan, even if they only earn $15,000 per year.

And the average single person paying for insurance on the individual market will only save money on Sanders’ plan if they make less than $30,000 per year.

If you’re married with employer-sponsored health insurance, you do a bit better than single people — you do better under Sander’s plan if your family earns $40,000 per year or less. If your family makes more than $40,000, you lose money.

And if you’re married and get your health insurance on the individual market, your break even point under Sanders’ plan is $85,000 per year.

All of this assumes that you’ll pay nothing for health insurance under Sanders’ plan, with the entire cost coming from increased taxes. As for the claim that you’ll make even more money by not having to pay to send your kids to state college, that assume you have kids, that they’re going to college, and that you want to send them to a state college. If you don’t have kids, you don’t benefit, and you end up paying for everyone else’s kids.

So basically, married people do better under Sanders’ plan than single people, who don’t do well at all.

In the end, you have to compare your own health insurance. Mine is a lot more than $3,400 per year.

Here are some of the calculations I ran. The link to the calculator is below.

You earn $200,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $1,310 more.
Sanders: Pay $19,400 more.

Couple earns $200,000 per year, married with no kids
Clinton: Pay $490 more.
Sanders: Pay $19,730 more.

You earn $150,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $550 more.
Sanders: Pay $14,600 more.

Couple earns $150,000, married with no kids
Clinton: Pay $270 more.
Sanders: Pay $16,000 more.

Couple earns $150,000 per year, married with two kids
Clinton: Pay $160 more.
Sanders: Pay $18,500 more.

You earn $100,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $140 more.
Sanders: Pay $9,320 more.

Couple earns $100,000 per year, married with no kids
Clinton: Pay $140 more.
Sanders: Pay $10,930 more.

You earn $75,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $200 more.
Sanders: Pay $7,590 more.

Couple earns $75,000 per year, married with no kids
Clinton: Pay $80 more.
Sanders: Pay $8,100 more.

Couple earns $75,000 per year, married with two kids
Clinton: Pay $40 more.
Sanders: Pay $9,140 more.

You earn $50,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $60 more.
Sanders: Pay $5,430 more.

Couple earns $50,000 per year, married with no kids
Clinton: Pay $70 more.
Sanders: Pay $5,750 more.

Couple earns $50,000 per year, married with two kids
Clinton: Pay $20 more.
Sanders: Pay $5,510 more.

You earn $30,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $30 more.
Sanders: Pay $3,390 more.

Couple earns $30,000 per year, married with no kids
Clinton: Pay $50 more.
Sanders: Pay $3,150 more.

You earn $25,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $30 more.
Sanders: Pay $2,630 more.

You earn $15,000 per year, single with no kids
Clinton: Pay $20 more.
Sanders: Pay $1,630 more.

You can try the calculator for yourself here.

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Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Instagram | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the Executive Editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown; and has worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, and as a stringer for the Economist. He is a frequent TV pundit, having appeared on the O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline, AM Joy & Reliable Sources, among others. John lives in Washington, DC. .

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