“When the Social Contract breaks from above, it breaks from below as well”

A photo essay. This is about the police, though that may not be obvious at first.

It’s also about Ferguson and the Social Contract.

When the Social Contract breaks from above …

The Song of the One Percent — "Who stole the people's money? Not me, I got it from this guy ..."

The Song of the One Percent — “Who stole the people’s money? Not me, I got it from this guy …”

… it breaks from below as well:

The Song of the Hopeless

The Song of the Hopeless

To see how this applies to Ferguson, read this, from Time (my emphasis and paragraphing):

Why Ferguson Was Ready to Explode

… Metrolink, St. Louis’s light rail system, completed its second line in 2006. It provided African Americans of East St. Louis, one of the poorest cities in the country, and of north St. Louis county much easier access to the St. Louis Galleria Mall and the central cultural corridor of the city, including the hip Delmar Loop district. Concurrently, the Galleria has since seen an astronomical increase in shoplifting, and there has also been an increase in general crime and hooliganism in the Delmar Loop.

This has led many to think that the Metrolink, as it has crossed racial boundaries, has enabled African American teenaged crime. This vicious cycle of young African Americans’ antisocial hostility and acting out, hardly unique to African Americans or even to Americans, and ever increasing white fear and barricade building, have intensified racial tensions, as people find the problem intractable and increasingly impossible to discuss honestly.

The current riot in Ferguson is largely a war between police and the young African Americans who think cops exist mostly to prevent African American from harming whites.

The War on the One Percent, the War on Crime, and the War on Terror are becoming three names for the same thing — forced by the One Percent. Soon they may be nearly identical. Witness this:

Salinas CA police with their new toy (and urban-friendly camouflage). Note the kick-ass sunglasses.

The Song of the Guardians — Salinas CA police with their new toy (and urban-friendly camouflage). Note the kick-ass sunglasses.

Peacekeepers, serving and protecting … the broken Social Contract.

A scheduling note

I’m back from much travel and will be posting intermittently for a while. Check here for new posts.

First up, three interviews I did at Netroots Nation, part of my Five Questions series. This year I spoke with Congressman Keith Ellison, economics professor and guru Stephanie Kelton, and political writer and activist Robert Cruickshank. Stay tuned for those. Each one was revealing.

GP

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Gaius Publius is a professional writer living on the West Coast of the United States.

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