Ebola update: Patient returns to US, Donald Trump is mad

An American Ebola patient returned to the US yesterday.  And Donald Trump is very upset about it, or something.

The first patient landed at Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Georgia, and was then transported in a biocontainment unit.  After landing, the patient was taken to Emory Hospital and placed in a special isolation unit designed to handle such patients.  The unit is separate from other areas of the hospital.  It even has a self-contained lab, so specimens from the patient can be tested in the unit itself.

The other Ebola patient is scheduled to follow in a few days and will also be treated at Emory.

Former Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is apparently beside himself over the news that American citizens are permitted to return to America when ill:

donald-trump-ebola

[NOTE FROM JOHN: People who help out are great, but must suffer the consequences? Why must they, if they’re doing something great? Trump’s tweet doesn’t even make sense. He makes it sound as if the people who are helping out did a reckless thing and deserve what they got, but at the same time he’s calling their actions “great.” So which is it?]

The patients will be treated by infectious disease doctors on staff at the hospital.  The CDC is located very close to the hospital and CDC staff will be available to help the physicians at Emory.

Vaccines and other treatments

The National Institute of Health will begin testing an Ebola vaccine in September of this year.  This is not the first Ebola vaccine that has been tried.

Thomas Geisbert, Ph.D. has developed a vaccine that has shown promise in protecting non-human primates against Ebola.  Additionally, this vaccine also has shown some positive results when given to monkeys after they have been infected by Ebola when they are still in the early stages of the disease.  The majority of vaccines only work well if given weeks in advance.  That allows the vaccine to stimulate the patient’s immune system to make antibodies that can attack the disease if he becomes infected.

Geisbert and his team, are also working on two other, non-vaccine methods of treating Ebola.  One makes use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) linked to lipid nano particles.  This was very effective when tested in rhesus monkeys.

Research is also taking place on using a slightly different approach.  These investigators are making a vaccine that is raised in genetically altered plants.

But, even if vaccine testing begins soon and gives promising results, it will still take time to get it into use.  So it wouldn’t be helpful in the near future.  The same holds true for the other possible treatment methods.  Additional time will be needed before they would be available as possible treatments or preventative medications.


Mark Thoma, MD, is a physician who did his residency in internal medicine. Mark has a long history of social activism, and was an early technogeek, and science junkie, after evolving through his nerd phase. Favorite quote: “The most exciting phrase to hear in science... is not 'Eureka!' (I found it!) but 'That's funny.'” - Isaac Asimov

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  • Roland

    These practices protect the ones giving care to the sick person, but do not improve the treatment of the patient him/herself. Once you have the disease, it doesn’t matter really whether or not you’ve got all that protective gear. I can’t see any reason why medical treatment at Emory would improve the outcome for the patient over treatment at a good facility in Liberia.

  • Virginia

    Have you ever been to Africa, or for that matter, any other “3rd world” country?

  • Virginia

    I don’t know any health care workers (doctors, nurses, lab people) who are working with a level 3 or level 4 containment disease who “cut corners”. We KNOW what can happen if we are not careful of these diseases.

  • BillFromDover

    And we can all rest assured that he would still be vehemently espousing these same views had it been his Trophy Wife instead?

    Is there a word for this that starts with an H?

  • Badgerite

    Your comment just seemed like a convenient place to put mine. It didn’t really elicit mine, as such.
    And most definitely agree.

  • MJ

    Anyone who still uses the tired old word “troll” or any form of it deserves a good smackdown.

  • cambridgemac

    You obviously know nothing about the countries involved.

  • cambridgemac

    It’s simpler than that. People who don’t choose to live in gated communities must suffer the consequences.
    The Donald isn’t afraid that his health will be ompacted by Ebola. He’s worried that the gummint will start spending to fight it – and his wallet will be impacted.

  • 2karmanot

    We just had a mind meld!

  • 2karmanot

    Well done!

  • 2karmanot

    Maybe that ‘thing’ on Trump’s head is susceptible to Ebola.

  • SkippyFlipjack

    I don’t agree with Trump but I can understand the concerns of people like him. (On this issue, I mean; there’s no one in the world actually like Donald Trump.) What’s interesting to me is how this issue, which doesn’t hew to a particular political ideology, seems to have a partisan split anyway. Maybe these things just start with the talking heads — sometimes when you hear an argument that makes sense to you it sticks and it’s tough to dislodge, so when Limbaugh starts railing about these selfish samaritans, it becomes a conservative meme.

    I think though it’s just consistent with this idea that conservatives generally see the world as a scarier place. Immigrants are up to no good, they want to steal our jobs, the government’s trying to control you, we need guns to protect ourselves, Sharia law!!, etc. (It’s funny though that this doesn’t extend to corporate behavior — you don’t see many conservatives concerned about the safety of things like toxic waste or global warming or GMOs.) These kinds of gut-level fears are powerful even when they don’t always match up well with facts. I imagine the Limbaughs of the world don’t even want these two people to get better — because who wants some sort of latent, mutated form of the virus walking around the U.S. of A?

    Life is scary, and when the chips are down, f*ck the other guy. They may want to consider that as the slogan for the next GOP convention.

  • http://hunteratrandom.blogspot.com/ rmthunter

    I’m not sure how my reference to teabaggers triggered a response about evangelical aid organizations and/or Franklin Graham.

    But, since Graham and his ilk are in the mix, think about how much more they could be doing if some of the money devoted to establishing their religious beliefs in secular law were spent on relief for those who really need it.

  • Badgerite

    Moral complexity Alert! This particular doctor was over there treating these ebola victims under the auspices of Samaritan’s Purse, an evangelical aid organization that was founded by the late Bob Pierce who also founded World Vision. Both organizations do emergency relief work around the world. Samaritan’s Purse has a very high rating at Charity Navigator. None other than Franklin Graham is a member on its Board of Directors. Franklin Graham notwithstanding, they do good work.

  • Badgerite

    I’m surprised Trump didn’t ask to see the Doctor’s birth certificate.

  • The_Fixer

    I see the TrumpTimer™ just expired. That’s the timer that Trump has that counts down the number of seconds since the last stupid verbal ejaculation he’s made, and alerts him that it’s time to make another. After all, he needs to make these periodic lame-brain statements so that his ego can be properly fed. ‘Cause that’s what truly matters in TrumpWorld®, feeding the Donald’s ego.

  • therling

    No good deed goes unpunished.

  • http://heimaey.us/ heimaey

    I think I have to take a leap of faith here and assume the doctors know what they’re doing and that we can learn a lot from this. I mean, this is the start of a great plot for SyFy series or something but it’s also real life.

  • olandp

    “…self centred, self important fools who wouldn’t know the meaning of the word humanitarian.”

    Funny that is the dictionary definition of “Trump”.

  • Indigo

    Oh, I see. I like it but it’s a lot to remember. :-)

  • http://hunteratrandom.blogspot.com/ rmthunter

    Trump is an attention whore — he’ll say whatever will get him some exposure in the press or blogosphere — sort of a Bryan Fischer lite.

    And he doesn’t really care whether he knows what he’s talking about.

  • http://hunteratrandom.blogspot.com/ rmthunter

    “How could anyone disagree with allowing life saving treatment to be
    administered to persons that have left the comfort of their lounge rooms
    to assist people in need?”

    It’s easy if you’re a teabagger — by definition, you’re not a decent person.

  • HelenRainier

    And once you make your decision about the decision, what of it? Will that change anything?

  • Tone

    Oh come on you just know that somewhere in the US some mad CIA doctor has already weaponized ebola. It isn’t that big of a deal if a US citizen comes home with it. In fact it may be yet another research opportunity for said mad CIA doctor.

  • KimJHeiss

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  • jared

    All of that is true, but we’re talking about one patient for now and another very soon. And if you look at the treatment options, none of them require a state-of-the-art medical facility.

    And it’s the immediate caregivers and anyone they come in contact with. People make mistakes. It happens. If you believe that the risk is zero, then of course it makes sense to bring him back. I just disagree that it is zero, which is how I arrived at my conclusion.

  • Craig McKerchar

    How could anyone disagree with allowing life saving treatment to be administered to persons that have left the comfort of their lounge rooms to assist people in need? These people are those that you can only hope and pray will be around at such a time that something horrific happens to you and being critical of the attempts to save their lives only serves to prove that there are many self centred, self important fools who wouldn’t know the meaning of the word humanitarian. These people are giving up their time and potentially lives in order to prevent this disease spreading and every single one of us not in the affected countries should be applauding their bravery every step of the way. I am sure Donald will come around if there is a buck or two to be made. Just because this is a war without weapons doesn’t mean Americans get left behind.

  • http://www.americablog.com/ Naja pallida

    People travel from areas with serious communicable diseases every day on airliners. It is possible to leave one place and be almost anywhere else on the globe inside of a day’s travel. It’s only by a blind miracle that we aren’t seeing more serious outbreaks.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Yeah well, my point of disagreement with your position is you seem to think an ocean will keep us safe from two people known to be infected and therefore under full quarantine measures…whereas we’re still receiving flights from all over the world, with planes full passengers we DON’T know are uninfected.

    I still think your risk assessment priorities are ass backwards.

  • http://www.americablog.com/ Naja pallida

    Our nation isn’t even capable of getting drinking water into a major US city after a storm, and you think we have any capability of setting up a state-of-the-art medical facility on foreign soil in record time?

    There was simply no viable option to get enough of the proper equipment, with enough resources to keep it maintained, not to mention enough security to keep it from all being pillaged or destroyed by the locals, to treat in an timely manner. Even the US Navy’s hospital ships, which are significantly better than a field hospital, and are really the only way we have of projecting medical care worldwide in a short time frame, would require weeks of refitting and retraining to even considering handling treating Ebola patients.

    What is the risk of bringing the virus here? The only people the patient will have any amount of contact with is their immediate caregivers. Exactly as it would have been over there, assuming they had adequate facilities. Those caregivers know and have accepted the risks and responsibilities. In a much more controlled environment proper protocols are more likely to be adhered to. These people don’t mess around. There is zero risk to the general public unless someone does something intentionally stupid.

  • Ninong

    Couldn’t we do an exchange and send Donald Trump to Liberia? He’s always wanted to go to Africa to search for the “real birth certificate.” He could start in Liberia and work his way to Kenya.

  • jared

    You remarking about my accidental double post gave me a good laugh.

  • Lawerence Collins

    Demonic, soulless sociopathic, Rethuglican zombie predator! Think it fits like perfectly

  • jared

    I guess we just disagree. To summarize, looking at the treatment options for an Ebola victim, I think it is possible to reasonably provide the 5 options remotely and adequately well. Couple that with the risk of bringing the virus here (this part is based on my skepticism of science research and reliability of quarantine units, something we also disagree on), and I think it was a reckless decision to fly him here. And those are my only two points.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Yeah, but by then the patients would be dead, thereby solving Jared’s moral quandary.

  • judybrowni

    For the pissy-pants, morally repugnant, and factually uninformed (or just flat out lying) concern trolls like Trump and Jared below (as well as his sock puppet):

    No, We Aren’t All Going to Die Because Ebola Patients Are Coming to US for Treatment
    http://my.firedoglake.com/jimwhite/2014/08/03/no-we-arent-all-going-to-die-because-ebola-patients-are-coming-to-us-for-treatment/

  • docsterx

    I agree, but again, much of the high tech equipment would be useless in those areas. A generator without fuel, ventilators with no oxygen, no running water – it would take years to set up area to be able to use that equipment effectively.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Gonna fly fuel and reliable power and water systems, and some modern hospitals over there, too?

    This is the part that is making me laugh, out loud, literally: You think an ocean’s distance will protect you from this disease. An ocean being crossed daily by hundreds of planes carrying tens of thousands of passengers. Passengers who may not even know they’ve been exposed, and thus won’t know to take any precautions until it’s too late.

    You’re living in a fantasy.

  • jared

    No, my suggestion was that we should have flown the necessary equipment and personnel over there to help them.

  • jared

    At any cost.

  • judybrowni

    For the morally repugnant, and factually uninformed (or just flat out lying) concern trolls like Trump and Jared below (as well as his sock puppet):

    No, We Aren’t All Going to Die Because Ebola Patients Are Coming to US for Treatment
    http://my.firedoglake.com/jimwhite/2014/08/03/no-we-arent-all-going-to-die-because-ebola-patients-are-coming-to-us-for-treatment/

  • docsterx

    OK, I understand. Thanks for explaining.

  • jared

    I’m talking about life sciences research in general.

  • jared

    I didn’t mean to post this twice. I had deleted the other comment because of the line breaks and then asked the moderator for help but by that point you and I had already started talking on that one.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    And in this case, “As far away as possible.”

  • docsterx

    A sense of skepticism is one thing. Some of what you stated above is just untrue. Perhaps you should have actually worked on an isolation unit with other professionals to get some first (gloved) hand experience before you make assumptions and generalizations about what goes on on the ground in Africa and in isolation units.

    What do peer reviewed papers with falsified data have to do with biocontainment for Ebola patients transported to the US or African quarantine methods?

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    What words?

    I’m looking at the facts and trying to determine whether or not this decision made sense.

    This means you wish the decision was yours, whether to abandon these American medical professionals to 3rd world wilderness medical facilities or to bring them home.

    From the start, you’ve been trying to find ways of supporting the coward Trump’s “let them die over there” position. A position which is morally and ethically repugnant. I would also add, I’ve worked for Sandia National Labs, so don’t think that access automatically buys you authority or deference. I knew a guy who worked for SNL who was an ardent Creationist. He was also a loon.

    And I have no idea why you’re raising the red herring about falsified papers. You won’t even address the points being made that the medical and research facilities in Africa are, on average, crap.

  • docsterx

    jared Guest, In case you missed my extensive reply to your previous, identical comment, or if you need to re reread it so that you might better understand it, it’s below.

    I disagree with a few of your points.

    The isolation techniques
    available in Africa are hardly similar to those available here. If
    you’ve looked at photos of the health care personnel in Africa, many are
    not completely protected. In some cases they are wearing paper masks,
    have areas of skin exposed, etc. Some equipment has to be manually
    decontaminated and reused. Their decontamination procedures there are
    limited sometimes bu lack of running water. IF you watched the video of
    Dr. Brantley getting out of the ambulance, he was wearing a head-to-toe
    “space suit.’ Not only are those not available in the Ebola areas, they
    would be virtually impossible to wear in the heat without having cold
    air circulating within. Again, not available in those areas.

    The
    “isolation” unit in Dr. Brantly’s “hospital” was the former chapel.
    They put several cots in there separated by curtains. Hardly an
    appropriate place to handle patients with a communicable disease. So,
    no, those on site have nowhere near the isolation equipment or
    facilities that are available elsewhere. You also need to remember that
    in the US, contaminated supplies and body fluids can be easily
    incinerated. In Africa, they need to be carried to a fire pit and
    burned. Less efficient than using an incinerator or autoclave. Which,
    of course are not available there.

    From reports I’ve gotten from
    other physicians either on the ground in that area or recently returned,
    there are no, or limited IV solutions to be had to treat shock,
    certainly no IV pressor medications, limited to no blood products, no
    ventilator support (sometimes only sporadic electricity), suction may
    not be available. Oxygen is not available in remote clinics, of it it
    is only in extremely limited supply. Treatment there not comparable to
    what is available in more advanced centers.

    In summary, workers
    there are not nearly so well protected as those in the US. Neither are
    they as well trained. Their equipment and supplies are either in short
    supply or lacking. Theor isolation facilities are primitive and were
    never designed to BE isolation facilities. They have a large number of
    Ebola patients to staff ratio. In Emory it will be quite the opposite,
    one or two patients to dozens of staff. Along with running water,
    electricity, negative pressure rooms, advanced biocontainment equipment,
    medications, IV fluids, blood and blood products, etc.

    Much
    information on the above from personal communications with physicians
    directly involved in the situation. Plus other sources.

  • docsterx

    People trained in barrier nursing and quarantine procedures rarely cut corners. They know that if they do, they could become ill and also infect their families and coworkers.

  • jared

    Please don’t put words in my mouth. I think it would be very helpful for you to work in a research lab for a little while to hone in your sense of skepticism. If you’d like, I can escort you into my old lab at SNL the next time I’m back, and demonstrate to you why you shouldn’t be so willing to accept the conclusions of any experiment. I can also forward you at least 10 peer-reviewed papers I’ve read in the last year with falsified data, some of which made it into Nature.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    He just wants to promote “out of sight, out of mind, and die quickly far far away.”

  • docsterx

    What are they doing over there? They’re trying to help save lives of those who are less fortunate who have Ebola. And they’re taking risks because they cannot be as safe as someone working in an isolation unit in the States or elsewhere. They have neither the time, experties or money to build real isolation units. Getting a generator is a great idea, but getting a steady sypply of fuel for a generator can be problematic. And electricity is only part of the problem. Limited or no running water. No adequate sewage disposal, no onsite lab to do Ebola testing, maybe no onsite lab period.

    1. Transport to remote sites in Africa is hardly “easy.” Some of these clinics are out in the bush with, at best, primitive roads. Shipping has to be done mostly through local drivers, not a company like UPS. And, even when transport can be arranges, sometimes equipment and supplies are stoles and never reach their destinations.

    2. IV fluids, effective isolation gear, IV pressor meds are very expensive. These charities don’t have huge budgets to pay for purchasing and shipping these items. Patients on IV pressor meds require VERY frequent blood pressure measurements. Not available in an understaffed, remote clinic, overwhelmed by patients.

    You’re oversimplifying how the epidemic can be treated.

  • judybrowni

    Typical Republican attitude to healthcare: if you get sick, die quickly. please.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    No, it’s fear. And faulty risk assessments and situational judgment.

    It’s a very, very good thing the decision isn’t up to you, for the sake of these doctors’ lives.

  • jared

    This isn’t about me being afraid. I’m looking at the facts and trying to determine whether or not this decision made sense.

    One really good reason to be concerned about the isolation is that people must follow the protocols to maintain the isolation. And people cut corners…. all the time.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    You really shouldn’t be afraid of those who are in full isolation, and for whom every precaution and measure is being taken.

    You want to be afraid? Fine: Fear all those people flying into our airports who maybe DON’T know they’re sick. Ebola’s incubation period is measured in days or weeks and it’s possible to be asymptomatic.

  • jared

    If none of those things are available, what exactly are they doing over there then? Also, all of those things could have as easily been transported over as it was to bring him here. A generator, 5000 IV’s filled with pressors and saline, and a respirator basically fit into 3 large cartons. Communication could be accomplished with a laptop and a satellite internet connection. The treatment options for ebola don’t require an American hospital. If Ebola were already on this continent, I’d be less opposed to this measure, but we were so lucky to be granted a reprieve by a massive ocean. It seems reckless to me.

  • docsterx

    I disagree with a few of your points.

    The isolation techniques available in Africa are hardly similar to those available here. If you’ve looked at photos of the health care personnel in Africa, many are not completely protected. In some cases they are wearing paper masks, have areas of skin exposed, etc. Some equipment has to be manually decontaminated and reused. Their decontamination procedures there are limited sometimes bu lack of running water. IF you watched the video of Dr. Brantley getting out of the ambulance, he was wearing a head-to-toe “space suit.’ Not only are those not available in the Ebola areas, they would be virtually impossible to wear in the heat without having cold air circulating within. Again, not available in those areas.

    The “isolation” unit in Dr. Brantly’s “hospital” was the former chapel. They put several cots in there separated by curtains. Hardly an appropriate place to handle patients with a communicable disease. So, no, those on site have nowhere near the isolation equipment or facilities that are available elsewhere. You also need to remember that in the US, contaminated supplies and body fluids can be easily incinerated. In Africa, they need to be carried to a fire pit and burned. Less efficient than using an incinerator or autoclave. Which, of course are not available there.

    From reports I’ve gotten from other physicians either on the ground in that area or recently returned, there are no, or limited IV solutions to be had to treat shock, certainly no IV pressor medications, limited to no blood products, no ventilator support (sometimes only sporadic electricity), suction may not be available. Oxygen is not available in remote clinics, of it it is only in extremely limited supply. Treatment there not comparable to what is available in more advanced centers.

    In summary, workers there are not nearly so well protected as those in the US. Neither are they as well trained. Their equipment and supplies are either in short supply or lacking. Theor isolation facilities are primitive and were never designed to BE isolation facilities. They have a large number of Ebola patients to staff ratio. In Emory it will be quite the opposite, one or two patients to dozens of staff. Along with running water, electricity, negative pressure rooms, advanced biocontainment equipment, medications, IV fluids, blood and blood products, etc.

    Much information on the above from personal communications with physicians directly involved in the situation. Plus other sources.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    I take it you’re not all that familiar with the technical, hospital and laboratory facilities available in 3rd world African nations.

  • jared

    When I realized that there were additional line breaks, I deleted this one. Then I fixed the line breaks and added one more sentence. Why didn’t the delete work?

    I also fixed the login problem. I was actually trying to improve the situation, not make it worse. Please delete this comment and restore my other one.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcrEqIpi6sg Moderator4

    You do not need to make two virtually identical comments under different usernames. Your “jared” comment was deleted.
    Please settle upon one identity when commenting henceforth.

  • jared

    There’s more to this story than Dr. Thoma is reporting.

    First, there’s clearly more than we are aware of about containment and contraction of Ebola:
    The protocols and gear that Dr. Brantly used were designed by the same collective intelligence and knowledge that were used to design the quarantine lab. Dr. Jamison, the Tennessee doctor who just arrived back said about Brantly, “He was very congnizant and careful with the hygiene precautions that he used. I’m not sure how it occurred that he was exposed.” That doesn’t give me much confidence that the collective knowledge is sufficient to keep the virus quarantined.

    Second, there’s nothing more that can be done at Emory that couldn’t be accomplished in Liberia:
    According to Dr. Ribner at Emory, “We depend on the body’s defenses to control the virus. We just have to keep the patient alive long enough inorder for the body to control this infection.” The treatment, accordingto Mayo Clinic is “Providing fluids, Maintaining blood pressure, Providing oxygen as needed, Replacing lost blood, Treating other infections that develop” These could all have easily been accomplished without transporting the patient back, especially given that it’s not
    clear how he contracted the virus.

    For these two reasons, I think that Trump came to the right conclusion, but obviously for the wrong reasons. It is wholly irresponsible to transport the patient back here if we don’t know how to quarantine it, especially since the treatment is trivial in nature and could be performed remotely.

  • jared

    The protocols and gear that Dr. Brantly used were designed by the same
    collective intelligence and knowledge that were used to design the
    quarantine lab. And Dr. Jamison, the Tennessee doctor who just arrived
    back said about Brantly, “He was very congnizant and careful with the
    hygiene precautions that he used. I’m not sure how it occurred that he
    was exposed.” That doesn’t give me much confidence that the collective
    knowledge is sufficient to keep the virus quarantined.

    Furthermore, according to Dr. Ribner at Emory, “We depend on the body’s defenses to
    control the virus. We just have to keep the patient alive long enough in
    order for the body to control this infection.” The treatment, according
    to Mayo Clinic is “Providing fluids, Maintaining blood pressure,
    Providing oxygen as needed, Replacing lost blood, Treating other
    infections that develop” These could all have easily been accomplished
    without transporting the patient back, especially given that it’s not
    clear how he contracted the virus.

  • http://musephotos.wordpress.com/ GarySFBCN

    When I don my nutcase hat, the only grounds for hysteria I see is the potential that Ebola will be weaponized in some bioweapons lab. But then, Trump would probably approve of that.

  • Indigo

    Translation, please.

  • Dave of the Jungle

    He’s probably worried that the thing he carries around on his head will catch the virus and expire.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Interestingly, Trump is one of those anti-vaxxer quacks…

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/donald-trump-vaccinations-autism

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    One thing is certain: Those who are ignorant, ill-informed and guided by their fears tend to be absolutely lousy at realistic risk assessment and risk mitigation. We take all the wrong measures and ignore the ones that would actually make sense.

  • http://musephotos.wordpress.com/ GarySFBCN

    Many of these people are also against the use of vaccines for anything. They are prone to hysterics, are easily manipulated and alway look for ‘the conspiracy.’

    And I’m waiting for one of them to admonish Sarah Palin that Ebola is a continent, not a country.

  • Lawerence Collins

    Just too bad we can’t infect all of the GOP. They’re slready DSSRZP.

  • KingCranky

    Trump got rich the old fashioned way, inheritance.

    And anyone, absolutely anyone, can build a financial empire when starting with inherited wealth.

    It’s far easier to turn $100 million into $1 Billion than it is to build $100 million from zero.

  • http://wicca.com/celtic/wicca/wicca.htm Colin

    Dog eat dog , he who dies with the most toys wins

  • sonoitabear

    Donald Trump is mad… That’s nothing new, he’s angry, too…

  • Silver_Witch

    Seen this one too over and over – and when the Donald files bankruptcy (like one of my rich bosses) they immediately get loans – when one of “us” does the same – we can get a loan for 20 years.

  • Silver_Witch

    I loved that episode…thanks for reminding me of it.

  • Silver_Witch

    The Death Penalty has always been wrong and should be ended. I hope that last execution stops it all together. We call other countries barbarians – and yet we abandon our home and kill them? I think it is Pot meet Kettle.

  • Silver_Witch

    Sadly – we are all so full of fear from the media that some don’t think it through – were it them they would want to be rescued.

  • Silver_Witch

    Thanks Docsterx – but I think I will pass. I was shocked during the last elections when the crowd cheered at people not having insurance…..seriously – if it were them they would be in line for care.

    I weep now a days – no real tears – when I read that shite – it makes me so sad.

  • Silver_Witch

    You know I read Atlas Shrugged in High School and never got any of that crap that the Republicans got out of it…I don’t remember being all that awed by it – although I though the writing was good. I didn’t see it as a “way to live”

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Yeah, but Trump applauds the altruism of the men and women literally risking their lives to help save lives in Africa — then attaches “deserved consequences” for being a good, brave and noble person.

    Seems to me Trump is saying his highest ideal is abject selfish cowardice.

  • Indigo

    It’s difficult to find sensible commentary on Yahoo! That’s why I don’t take that portal to Arkham except to research commentary on the dread Cthulhu’s most recent pronouncements from Miskatonic University where, by all appearances, Donald Trump sits on the board.

  • docsterx

    It’s interesting that everyone is freaking about Dr. Brantly coming back from Liberia with Ebola. Even though he was transported in a biocontainment unit, then in a space suit into the isolation unit at Emory.

    No one seems to be thinking that people on medical missions to Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone have been rotating back to the US for months. One doctor or I’m aware of, just came back from Liberia on July 1st, months after the outbreaks started. He and his teammates are fine. Peace Corps volunteers, finished with their tours have come back. Dr. Brantly’s wife and children were in Liberia visiting him. They flew back without biocontainment precautions. Dr Jamison, the Tennessee physician, who just flew back from that area, who doesn’t have any symptoms. He just flew back, no isolation pod. How many people have traveled to the US from the affected countries since the start of the outbreak? None were wearing space suits. Yet we bring back one person who is confirmed to have Ebola under strict barrier/quarantine precautions and millions freak out. Estimates are that there are several hundred foreign doctors, nurses and ancillary personnel in the Ebola area. Only a very few have come down with Ebola, and they are surrounded with Ebola patients 24/7.

    I can understand being alarmed at a deadly, infectious disease. I can understand prople wanting to take precautions to be as safe as possible. But many people are just panicking and fear mongering in addition to trying to score come political points off of this. Disgusting.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    When people who spent their teen years jerking off to Atlas Shrugged started running things.

  • docsterx

    Agree. In Trump’s case, especially. He applauds people going to Africa to help. Of course, he could open his wallet and donate to help out at no risk to himself. Doctors Without Borders and the other medical groups have limited to no supplies, equipment, etc. They could use medicines, IV fluids, other supplies, equipment, etc. Trump uses this crisis to generate publicity for himself and to appeal to others who want to keep the infected US citizen-missionaries out of their own country.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    And then declare bankruptcy again to avoid paying the tab.

  • http://wicca.com/celtic/wicca/wicca.htm Colin

    When the ‘bottom line’ became the bottom line I’m afraid Silver_Witch

  • http://wicca.com/celtic/wicca/wicca.htm Colin

    Pathetic indeed. Man’s inhumanity to Man is not nearly as rare as we would like to believe.

  • Dave of the Jungle

    A Bozo’s gotta Bozo.

  • AJayne

    Donald Trump: a firm believer in the “no good deed goes unpunished” platitude…

  • TheOriginalLiz

    This reminds me of the MASH episode where the racist was told he’d been given some “black” blood by mistake, after they had dyed him with iodine while he was unconscious.

  • http://wicca.com/celtic/wicca/wicca.htm Colin

    Don’t worry Chewy , even a self promoting blowhard filled with poison would get the best treatment possible.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Yep. If Trump himself was sick, he’d be demanding no expense be spared to cure him — even if it required the sacrifice of human test subjects.

  • TheOriginalLiz

    Americans have become a**holes. They want to abandon doctors who catch Ebola, and are delighted that it took an excruciatingly long time for Arizona’s latest sanctioned murder. It’s okay for a copy to kill a guy who was selling cigarettes in an illegal chokehold and on and on and on. It’s embarrassing.

  • TheOriginalLiz

    If it makes “The Donald” mad, it must be the correct decision. I don’t know how he got rich, but it certainly wasn’t through good sense.

  • bkmn

    Remember Donald Trump’s rule #1:
    It’s ALWAYS about him.

    And he doesn’t have to make sense, he just has to appeal to the same crowd that thinks Sarah Palin is wise.

  • docsterx

    You should read some of the posts that are being written on sites like Yahoo!, CNN, MSNBC and others where Ebola, US patients coming home, etc. are being discussed. They are much worse, and much more blunt, than Trump’s. They either haven’t read the information in the articles, read it and didn’t understand it or just are more sure that they are right regardless of the science and expert opinions. Pathetic.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    That’s just one of Trump’s series of increasingly hysterical, shrieking tweets relating how much of a pants-crapping narcissistic selfish coward he really is.

    He even refers to those who would try to cure these doctors as “liberal do gooders.”

    And to think this craven bastard, this ferret-chapeau bedecked poltroon actually thinks he’d make a fine President of the United States.

    (Attached: Donald’s hair enjoys a rare day off.)

  • FLL

    Sounds like Trump is rather ignorant of modern medical procedure. The two Ebola patients are not only in isolation. As you note in your post, they are “transported in a biocontainment unit…” and “…taken to Emory Hospital and placed in a special isolation unit designed to handle such patients.” Trump always makes such a fool of himself, but then, making a fool of yourself is a right that is guaranteed by the First Amendment. Even Americablog’s moderators are very lenient in that regard.

  • Silver_Witch

    When did this country start abandoning its own? When Americans go out to do good – we support them when something goes wrong….period.

    What selfish people American’s have become. I am actually ashamed that people think like this here…and worry that they get a platform to say such awful things.

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