Glenn Beck: Liberals were right about Iraq

On his radio show on Tuesday, conservative sky-is-falling paranoid Glenn Beck admitted that liberals were right about it being a bad idea to invade Iraq.

Beck’s comments came on the heels of the news that Iraq is falling apart at the seams while Al-Qaeda-backed insurgents take over major cities in the north, and march on Baghadad. And while liberals are reticent about getting back into the same costly war we just got out of, Republicans like Dick Cheney are just itching to jump back in.

Beck has these fits of clarity every once in a while. But they don’t seem to complement his otherwise nutty history of being just as hysterical as the next guy. When Beck says something like this, I have to wonder if he truly believes it:

We are far from reaching across the aisle. I shouldn’t say that. The Republicans and Democrats are perfectly fine reaching across the aisle. They are not only reaching across the aisle, they are reaching across the aisle and fondling each other. It’s just they are on the same exact page, and they will demonize. The Republicans are doing it, and the Democrats will do it. They will demonize anyone that steps out of line with the parties.

Sounds nice, but Glenn Beck is still part of the problem. A big part of the problem.

Now on to Beck’s comments about Iraq:

Maybe we could come together now on this nightmare in Iraq. From the beginning, most people on the left were against going into Iraq. I wasn’t. At the time I believed that the United States was under threat from Saddam Hussein. I really truly believed that Saddam Hussein was funding terrorists. We knew that. He was funding the terrorists in Hamas. We knew that he was giving money. We could track that. We knew he hated us. We knew that without a shadow of a doubt. It wasn’t much or a stretch to believe that he would fund a terror strike against us, especially since he would say that. So I took him at his word.

Glenn Beck

Glenn Beck

There were also atrocities that were happening in Iraq torture chambers, mass graves. At the time, the unanimous belief – even with Hillary Clinton and everybody else – was that he had weapon of mass destruction. There was also the element – and this is really what spoke to me – of bringing freedom to the people of Iraq for the first time in their long history. I don’t want to control Iraq, but I have a soft spot for people who are being tortured and just want freedom because I really, truly believe Democrats and Republicans are the same. Israelis and Palestinians are the same. Once you get the politicians to leave the room, once you can deprogram people from what the politicians and leaders have said, everyone is pretty much the same. It’s like, ‘I just want to be left alone.’ ‘I just want to raise my family, have fun.’ ‘I want a decent life.’ Then politicians get involved and program us to hate each other. You have to be carefully taught who to hate.

Now, in spite of the things I felt at the time when we went into war, liberals said: We shouldn’t get involved. We shouldn’t nation-build. And there was no indication the people of Iraq had the will to be free. I thought that was insulting at the time. Everybody wants to be free. They said we couldn’t force freedom on people. Let me lead with my mistakes. You are right. Liberals, you were right. We shouldn’t have….

But I agree with you: You cannot force democracy on the Iraqis or anybody else. It doesn’t work. They don’t understand it or even really want it. They may be too immersed in their own belief of Sharia Law to embrace liberty or at least at this time. If people vote for Sharia Law, they vote for Sharia Law. We tried. What can we do? We have lost thousands of American lives. We have lost thousands of lives on the Iraqi side and tens of thousands have been wounded. We have spent $2 trillion – say that again – $2 trillion, and upwards of 200,000 Iraqi citizens, aid workers, insurgents have been killed. That’s the conservative number. Liberals will tell you it’s almost 1 million people. I don’t know what the number is, but after all of that, hundreds of thousands of lives, $2 trillion, the best minds in the world trying to do it, it’s about to fall apart.

I’m not sure about Beck’s “they’re not ready for democracy” argument, but I’ve long believed, or at least suspected, that you can’t foist democracy on anyone. They have to fight for it. Countries need to have their own revolutions in order for a new way of life and governance to coalesce and cement. That doesn’t mean that we should just sit back and watch bad things happen. But I worry that when it comes to nation-building, countries that don’t adopt change via revolution don’t necessarily achieve change that lasts.

I think of Soviet Russia vs. Eastern Europe. The Eastern European countries overthrew their communist overlords. The Russians? Not so much.

So I’m not necessarily against assisting pro-democracy efforts, or even pro-democracy insurgents, depending on the case. But if you don’t have the buy-in of the people, if you don’t have an actual people’s revolution, I think it’s difficult for freedom to stick.


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Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown (1989); and worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, and as a stringer for the Economist. Frequent TV pundit: O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline & Reliable Sources. Bio, .

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  • LanceThruster

    Glenn:

    Have another drink it’ll make you feel better,
    Have another drink and you’ll feel alright.
    If you feel down and you’re under the weather
    Have another drink and you’ll feel alright.

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  • Bill_Perdue

    You’re dead wrong.

    Don’t just pretend that Republicans are worse at union busting, or busting the Bill of Rights, engaging in mass murder and genocide in wars of aggression, or that they spend more time plotting to gut social security, of that Republicans oppose anti-discrimination laws more than Democrats. Prove it.

    What part of your agenda has been accomplished by Democrats, as opposed to the work of mass movements? What wars did they stop. Did they pass ENDA without cult exceptions, did they restore the banking regulations, did they repeal their own DOMA, did they save the Bill of Rights or did they pass NDAA?

    If your agenda is the same as the Democrats – war, union busting, NDAA, a minimum wage guaranteed to please the bosses and owner, the racist and illegal murder of Arab Americans and etc – then you are either very right wing or very out of touch with working class America.

  • Bill_Perdue

    ” (I mean doable things, not abstract ideas with no chance of working in the current system.)” No real change can occur in the current system. Looking for real change in the current system is silly. It’s a failure of historical understanding to assume that people will not reject a permanently disabled and utterly corrupt system in it’s death agony in favor of a better system.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    As bad as Democrats are, Republicans are a lot worse. Would Gore have invaded Iraq? Probably not. And the fact that W got elected is mostly to blame on a corrupt system in Florida and people who voted for Nader in a swing state (especially but not just Florida). If Democrats had majorities you might be able to push them on these issues. When they are terrified in swing states of losing to an even more conservative Republican they run to the middle or even the right. You can keep your moral high ground. I’d rather get some of my agenda than none.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    And that doesn’t change until we get the big money out of politics. I don’t know how we do that without major changes to the Supreme Court and to Congress. The Supreme Court may be fixable if we can elect another 2-3 terms for Democrats in the White House. Congress is not. You’re asking the crooks to give up the loot. Not gonna happen. The moment when campaign finance fell apart in my opinion was in a hearing when one of the Senators asked McCain if he was accusing his colleagues of taking bribes. His answer should have been “yes”. He should have said it out loud and let them go on the defensive. They do take bribes and it’s perfectly legal. Shame on all of us for re-electing such crooked people and allowing them to line their pockets. Almost all of them leave office as millions on salaries that ought to make that level of wealth difficult. Our current system is corrupt to its core. I just don’t know what we do about it. (I mean doable things, not abstract ideas with no chance of working in the current system.)

  • Hue-Man

    Your comment reminded me of something from the Iraq occupation that I’d conveniently ignored – Blackwater (or whatever sanitized new name its chosen). “Outsourcing” its Border Services Agency and its internal security services was one of the major factors contributing to the fall of the Roman Empire (I’m not an expert). The (foreign) mercenaries were trained by Romans in Latin, learned all the strengths/weaknesses of Rome, fed the intelligence back to their leadership, and led the attacking forces which the fat, lazy, untrained, lion-watching Romans were unable to repel.

    I imagine their 1% made windfall profits from the outsourcing, too!

  • lynchie

    They sure tracked them in Vietnam, in fact they moved bodies around and counted them again and again to show body count figures that supposedly proved we were winning.

  • lynchie

    Frankly they don’t give a damn. The prevailing sentiment of the 1% is “I’ve got mine and I want yours as well”

  • lynchie

    thanks for this information. In the states having premium insurance, being rich, part of the 1%, etc. moves you to the front of the line. Nice to see the government in Ontario realizes the rich have more to spare than someone at the bottom. Just the reverse in the U.S. Also Premier Wynn is an openly gay female the first elected in Canada. Somehow the world didn’t grind to a halt or bring on the Rapture.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    If the American politicians understand, it must be at an unconscious level, because look at the way they’re arming our police now: Like an inwardly directed army that presumes citizens are suspected enemies of the state. Then there’s the “Total Information Awareness” spying by the NSA and other agencies. And the ruthless way they now go after whistleblowers.

    Not to be cute, but there’s a line in the original Star Wars, where Princess Leia remarks to Governor Tarkin, “The tighter you squeeze, the more systems will slip through your fingers.” Squeezing tighter — oppression — seems to be the usual response for empires tottering on the edge of self-destruction.

  • Hue-Man

    In B.C., hip replacement data from the website are: 50% receive surgery within 17 weeks, 90% within 40.7 weeks. UBC (300 on list) 16.0/29.1, VGH (165 waiting) 11.0/29.7. http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/swt/faces/Search.jsp

    What is the wait-time for an American who is poor, isn’t a senior, and has no medical insurance?

    I’ve worked and lived in Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto and never met anyone who ever went to the U.S. – or elsewhere – for medical treatment. I can’t recall even a single conversation about someone considering doing that.

    And here’s a first step in addressing income inequality: the new Ontario Liberal (center-left) majority government will re-introduce its budget in the next few weeks. It includes TAX INCREASES on the wealthy:
    • Lower the taxable income threshold for the 13.16 per cent tax rate from $514,090 to $220,000
    • Add a new tax rate of 12.16 per cent on taxable income between $150,000 and $220,000
    http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/publication/budget-highlights-2014-en.pdf

    Short version: If your taxable income is over $150,000, your taxes are going up.

  • Hue-Man

    In 2002, Iraq had no means of delivering a nuclear warhead to the U.S., even if you believe that they had built one. They knew this and lied when they talked about “mushroom clouds” – maybe Saddam was working at the pool of one of his palaces to train dolphins to swim to the U.S. then find their way up the Potomac…When I broached this with an American colleague, he told me I was a stupid uninformed foreigner who didn’t know the truth, etc.

    The issue of what holds a nation together has concerned me for a while, not just in the context of Iraq. Empires and nations have disintegrated, usually violently, after centuries of cohesiveness without their leaders appreciating the changes that were in process to undermine that cohesiveness.

    My concerns started when the right-wing Conservative Party started changing Canada’s immigration rules, voting rules, and support of social programs. For a country that has one of the highest legal immigration rates in the world, ethnic and religious battles have not been imported with Canada’s new arrivals – conflicts between people who would be killing each other in their home country/region are virtually unknown in Canada. I’ve found only one discussion of the issue and *SPOILER ALERT*, a major factor is a quick path to citizenship. http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/TCM-canadian-exceptionalism

    In the U.S. context, are TeaParty/GOP policies undermining the ability of the United States to remain united? Tearing apart community/social constructs, encouraging wealth accumulation by the 1%, handing out firearms without controls, overt racism, and the impoverishment of lower classes are not ways to build a nation! Does American political leadership understand what might cause the break-up of the American Empire?

  • Silver_Witch

    Of course the Liberals were/are right. If only they would listen to us first…then act.

  • Drew2u

    Beck, there’s a great starting point for ya since you realize Liberals were right:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zVn0YMxB6o

  • Bill_Perdue

    “There was no hope of passing single payer or any other liberal plan.” Agreed, at least not with Democrats who were bribed by insurance and pharmaceutical companies running the WH and Congress.

  • Bill_Perdue

    Democrats (with a little help from their Republican partners in crime) accomplished DADT and DOMA, NAFTA, deregulation, the Crash of 2007, wars of aggression and genocide, massive intractable unemployment, NDAA (indefinite detention on a whim), a policy of extrajudicial and so far racist murders of US citizens, union busting, an unlivable minimum wage and you want more of these ‘accomplishments?

    Millions of working class American will not be joining you in your quest for more of these ‘accomplishments’.

  • Dave of the Jungle

    Big Oil gets whatever it wants when the Repugs are in power.

  • The_Fixer

    Of course, anyone in Iraq who wasn’t us was an “enemy combatant”.

    Everything coming out of the mouth of any U.S. government spokesperson at the time could be classified as “Newspeak”.

    But you have to respect their creativity, even if it was blatant verbal re-engineering of the truth. And yes, the term “respect” is pure snark.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Not surprisingly, failing to attempt to keep ‘enemy’ civilian deaths to a minimum is also considered a war crime.

    Hence why they kept labeling every single Iraqi who was killed a ‘combatant.’

  • pappyvet

    I know. Between 170,000 and 1 million is a helluva spread

  • The_Fixer

    What was particularly disturbing about that fact was the language used when they were asked about it. I don’t remember the exact quote or who said it, but the cold phrase “We don’t track enemy combatant’s deaths” figures into it. The cavalier attitude they had about civilian deaths showed their monstrous and criminal nature.

    Yet we were there to “help” Iraqis attain freedom and democracy.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    I found it rather telling how we knew to the individual exactly how many Americans were killed and wounded in Bush & Cheney’s war crimes — yet they went out of their way to ensure nobody could find out exactly how many Iraqis were killed, maimed, or wounded.

  • pappyvet

    Of the people who were against going into Iraq I recall the term traitor being thrown around rather loosely. 4,486 U.S. service members were killed in Iraq between 2003 and 2012. And somewhere between 170,000 and I million Iraqi citizens were killed. Over 60 billion was spent on reconstruction projects in Iraq from 2003 to 2012. At least 10 percent of the money cannot be accounted for.
    Yep , sounds like treason to me. But not from anyone who was against going.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    Yes, it’s so much better to sit on the sidelines and throw spitballs at anyone who might be able to accomplish something.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    ACA is indeed the conservative answer to health care reform. Even that could barely get passed. There was no hope of passing single payer or any other liberal plan.

  • http://parkandbark.wordpress.com/ Houndentenor

    Where would the funding come for Kucinich to make such a run. He might have considered it but without millions there’s not much point. It’s easy to think someone should do something but Kucinich is not a billionaire. He doesn’t have millions of his own money to fund a campaign. I always laugh when the press speculates about when various candidates will drop out of the primaries. the answer is always the same: when the campaign runs out of money and they have no choice.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    I don’t think he did. He’s just doing a stopped clock impression right now.

    If you read the transcript of his comments, he’s not even correct, right, or truthful for all of them. Just a few selected bits.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    I know what you mean. Lie after lie — and zero accountability.

  • Indigo

    What alarmed me most about that time frame and the sequence of events that led up to the war was the clear understanding that the government officials were probably lying but we let them proceed without due process. The theory at that time that I found most alarming was that they were the elected officials and so we should trust their judgment. That’s why we elected them. That scenario continues to haunt my nightmares.

  • therling

    When did Beck go back on his meds?

  • chrislib

    When did Ben Gleck realize he hates America and wants the terists to win? You know, he does look a little French…

  • http://buddybest.tripod.com/index.html BuddyNovinski

    Yes, we should have learned that democracy needs time to develop institutions. The German Empire was slowly moving in that direction before 1914. So, the Treaty of Versailles forced democracy on a nation not yet ready for it. There was so much chaos that eventually the German people preferred order over liberty. Then came the Great Depression, leaving open for a certain Corporal Schicklegruber to exploit the situation.
    Ironically, democracy finally won over Germany, but it took decades and measures of stability. So, when Germany united in 1990, the institutions were there to continue it.

  • Bill_Perdue

    Romney/Heritage/Obamacare is just more of the same Republican authored profiteering system. The difference is that now we’re forced into being part of an inadequate system and working class taxpayers are also forced to subsidize the enormous profits being gouged by insurance and pharmaceutical companies. Congress and the White House, in their current banana republic version, were unbelievably craven for passing such a bill after being bribed for a few scores of millions.

    Some of the largest health insurers are hitting all-time highs. … Shares of UnitedHealth Group (UNH +0.74%), Humana (HUM +0.91%), Aetna (AET +0.94%) and WellPoint (WLP +1.73%) rallied Wednesday — with all four
    recording all-time highs in the wake of the Obama administration announcement that total enrollment in Affordable Care Act health exchange plans now tops 5 million.
    MSN Money March 20th, 2014

    http://money.msn.com/top-stocks/post–insurance-stocks-soar-on-obamacare-sign-ups

    and http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2013/10/26/despite-glitches-obamacare-profit-windfall-to-insurers-well-underway/

  • lynchie

    Being born and raised in Canada, but residing her in the U. S. for the past 30 years i have seen the difference between the two systems. I still have family residing in Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Regina and Calgary so a good broad section of the country. None, I repeat none of them would trade the Canadian system for the U.S. Sure there are some delays but not for trauma or immediate needs. You might have to wait for a total knee or hip but heart conditions and the like are treated immediately.
    we have chosen a system which puts profit ahead of medical delivery and outcomes and as such it is fraught with the greed associated with profit at all costs. Remarkable how many americans believe our system superior to the so called socialist systems of other countries.

  • Bill_Perdue

    Or, I’m not really up on liberals.

  • Bill_Perdue

    The VA scandals show how badly vets are treated and how tragically they die. It could be easily solved. http://labornotes.org/2014/06/fix-va-waits-hire-more-staff

    The rest of us could get much better care with socialized medicine. “The GuardianTuesday 17 June 2014 15.27 EDT – Study by Washington-based foundation says healthcare provision in the US is the worst in the world. The NHS has been declared the world’s best healthcare system by an international panel of experts who rated its care superior to countries which spend far more on health.

    The same study also castigated healthcare provision in the US as the worst globally. Despite putting the most money into health, America denies care to many patients in need because they do not have health insurance and is also the poorest at saving the lives of people who fall ill, it found.

    The report has been produced by the Commonwealth Fund, a
    Washington-based foundation which is respected around the world for its
    analysis of the performance of different countries’ health systems. It examined an array of evidence about performance in 11 countries, including detailed data from patients, doctors and the World Health Organisation.
    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/17/nhs-health?CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

  • Bill_Perdue

    He also voted for the ACA scam. He’s the best they’ve got and he’s nothing.

  • Bill_Perdue

    I like the end of the Republic, beginning of the Empire period of Roman history but the War of the Roses fits just as well.

  • Max_1

    We have a winner!!~!!

  • Max_1

    I came to that exact same conclusion when Kuchinich put his support behind Obama after claiming his defeat in the primaries instead of switching to Independent and continuing the fight.

    Also he demonstrated that same lack of courage when he allowed Pelosi to scuttle his 35 Articles of Impeachment.

    He looks rather well adjusted and at completely at home on FOXNews(R).
    Odd…

  • Max_1

    At first I was shocked that Perdue would attribute Liberal to these Dems…
    … But then, I saw that tongue poking in that cheek of his.

  • http://www.americablog.com/ Naja pallida

    There’s probably a reason why the US is the only country in the world with a two-party Jeffersonian-style Republic form of government. And it isn’t because all those parliamentary democracies out there just haven’t found enlightenment yet. Even countries where we propped up their government chose not to adopt our fundamentally flawed system.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    Yeah, well, we’re really good at exporting our own form of government — falsely advertised as being a democracy.

  • lynchie

    In addition they do little to take care of its poor, elderly and injured military while heaping car loads of gold onto the 1% who don’t fight, don’t expose themselves and who constantly whine that it is so hard to be rich. Like Hillary’s comment, Bill and I left the white house broke. In a pig’s fucking ass. I call horseshit on that whopper.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    There was not ‘universal belief’ that Iraq and Hussein had WMDs.

    There were plenty of experts, including Joe Wilson, whose wife’s career as a CIA analyst was ruined because he dared to insist the claims of yellowcake and aluminum tubes and mobile bio labs were nothing but lies.

    It is true that democracy cannot be imposed by the barrel of a gun — or as a result of ‘shock and awe’ airstrikes. But Iraq’s inability to enact and maintain a democratic form of government isn’t because they’re children who don’t understand the super-duper awesome-sauce of this thing called democracy or a democratic republic.

    It’s because existing power structures — which before the war were remarkably secular for a Middle Eastern nation — were wiped away, along with much of the infrastructure of modern civilization. And none of it was worth the cost. Through illegal war and torture and the rest, America lost what little remained of its soul and its moral standing in the world. Gitmo became a recruiting tool for future terrorists. Blood and horror is what we bought with all those lives and all that money.

    Yes, we liberals and hippies were right. The war was not worth fighting, but not because everybody believed in the pretenses given, the lies told. Quite a few of us knew they were lies, and many of these were experts.

    And let’s also not forget that America’s goal was never really democracy or anything like it. The entire purpose was to replace an uncooperative, recalcitrant strongman with another more compliant strongman, one who would owe debts to those who put him in power.

  • nicho

    Basically, the US political scene today is just the War of the Roses all over again. No matter who wins, the peasants (that’s us) are screwed.

  • Bill_Perdue

    A very cruel joke considering the causalities and damage the various American regimes have inflicted.

  • Bill_Perdue

    Hillary Clinton is a typical Democrat politician. I agree with you about one thing, Democrats and Republicans are the same party fighting over the spoils and no reasonable person would be involved with either.

  • angryspittle

    You are nuts. Hillary is just another corporate whore. Don’t listen to what she says, watch what she does. Would a liberal sit on the board of an outfit like Wal-Mart for 6 years? She has been anointed by Wall St. and the media as the Dem nominee already. Let me be clear. No one that posed any type of threat to the powers that be could ever sniff the nomination of either party. Wall St. was Obama’s biggest backer in 08. They are not liberals. I might describe them as Rockefeller Republicans.

  • Bill_Perdue

    A few house members voted against it. It they’re still in the by now reactionary party run by Democrat politicians, they’re in the wrong party.

  • pappyvet

    chumming for relevancy

  • Bill_Perdue

    Yes.

  • Bill_Perdue

    The point is that the two parties have converged so much that the labels people used to apply to them are meaningless. Liberal now means conservative and conservative os now reactionary. Except for cosmetic differences they share the same politics. They do, for sure, squabble in a partisan way to try to win votes and bribes (campaign contribution) but that has nothing to do with their politics.

    The Clintons are self-described liberals but in reality they’re Dixiecrats, as are many Republicans. There are no Democrat politicians that come to mind who are liberal in terms of the definition you provided.

    The reason I provided the list of the Senate vote, and I have a similar one for DOMA, is to prove that point that they are not liberals. Most Democrat politicians are conservatives or reactionaries who refuse to give us a union shop, who took bribes and ended the chance for socialized medicine, who are happy lap dogs of the rich (when they’re not rich themselves), who have no regard for the environment, who support FTAs, who applaud wars of aggression, and who periodically vote to gut the Bill of Rights.

  • taikan

    If you want to know what a “real liberal” thought about the invasion of Iraq before it occurred, you should read why Barbara Lee voted against the AUMF. While right-wing types may think of Hillary Clinton as a “liberal,” real liberals and/or progressives don’t view her that way.

  • angryspittle

    Oh Christ, you’re not saying Hillary is a liberal are you?

  • QAdams

    It’s kind of a joke that Amerika — a plutocracy not a democracy — goes around claiming that they and only they can teach other nations how to properly govern themselves.

  • Indigo

    I’m not entirely comfortable with describing Hillary as “liberal.” She’s opportunistic, that’s a given, but “liberal” as I used to understand it means compassionate, sensible, and open to a spectrum of interests. Hillary represents many things that resonate in those directions but in the final analysis Hillary is about Hillary and that’s as far as I see that road going. I think she’d make an excellent president, she’s perfectly capable of instituting the police surveillance state the public seems to demand and I’m confident that she can work with the CIA and the NSA and Corporate America successfully. That’s about as good as it’s going to get until the Revolution tosses all that nonsense out.

  • nicho

    There’s a guy with a plastic bag on his head, pushing a shopping cart on the next street. He yells a lot. He may make sense once in a while, but I steer a wide berth around him. I feel the same way about Glenn Beck.

  • The_Fixer

    Gold-Boy, we’re right about a lot of things. You should listen more often.

  • Bill_Perdue

    Beck is wrong, as usual, about liberals being opposed to the Iraq genocide. What you have to remember about Beck is that he’s the real deal – he’s a fascist – and that he’s very, very ambitious. And the other thing about Beck is that he’ll do a bit of rebranding if the polls swing against him or his views.

    Here’s the real liberal view of the invasion of Iraq:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkS9y5t0tR0

    In all 28 of Democrats in the Senate voted for the invasion, occupation and genocide in Iraq. (Please don’t claim they didn’t know it would be a genocide. They’ve all heard of Vietnam.) In the Senate 29 Democrats and 48 Republicans voted yes and 1 Republican, 21 Democrats, and 1 Independent (Bernie Sanders) voted no. In the House 215 Republicans and 82 Democrats voted yes and while 6 Republicans, 12 independent and 126 Democrats voted no. (Three abstained.)

    Here are the details of the Senate vote:

    Arkansas Blanche Lincoln (D): Yes

    California Dianne Feinstein (D): Yes

    Connecticut Christopher Dodd (D): Yes Joseph Lieberman (D): Yes

    Delaware Joseph Biden (D): Yes Thomas Carper (D): Yes

    Florida Bill Nelson (D): Yes

    Georgia Max Cleland (D): Yes Zell Miller (D): Yes

    Indiana Evan Bayh (D): Yes

    Iowa Tom Harkin (D): Yes

    Louisiana John Breaux (D): Yes Mary Landrieu (D): Yes

    Massachusetts John
    Kerry (D): Yes

    Montana Max Baucus (D): Yes

    Nebraska Ben Nelson (D): Yes

    Nevada Harry Reid (D): Yes

    New Jersey Robert Torricelli (D): Yes

    New York Hillary Clinton (D): Yes Charles Schumer (D): Yes

    North Carolina John Edwards (D): Yes

    North Dakota Byron Dorgan (D): Yes

    South Carolina Ernest “Fritz” Hollings (D): Yes

    South Dakota Thomas Daschle (D): Yes Tim Johnson (D): Yes

    Washington Maria Cantwell (D): Yes

    West Virginia Jay Rockefeller (D): Yes

    Wisconsin Herb Kohl (D): Yes

  • Dave of the Jungle

    Stuff happened.

  • http://www.americablog.com/ Naja pallida

    The best war profiteers that money can buy.

  • https://twitter.com/MetroIssues Metro Issues

    I’m glad I wasn’t drinking a beverage when I read “the best minds in the world trying to do it”. Egads.

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