Haiyan, possibly strongest typhoon ever, hits Philippines, 200 mph, amazing satellite images

Typhoon Haiyan, possible the largest hurricane to ever hit land, with sustained winds of up to 200mph (320kph), is currently striking the Philippines.

CNN reports that the wind gusts are bigger than Katrina and Sandy combined.  And the storm surge is three to four times that of Hurricane Sandy that flooded New York City and much of the northeast last year.

And CNN’s meteorologist says clearly climate change had a role:

CNN Anchor: This is just another extraordinarily big storm here, does this have anything to do with climate change?

Meteorologist: You know, you can’t blame one storm on climate change, but you just referenced so many.  Can you reference Sandy, Katrina, Rola, Gilbert, this thing, Kip, Tip – can you put climate change on the menu? Certainly when you get that many things… when you start adding up everything… every single time these storms are the biggest, the biggest, the biggest.

I’ve scoured the Web for the best photos of Typhoon Haiyan, and I think I might have found them.  Enjoy.

Here is an amazing satellite photo of Haiyan from Eumetsat.

Typhoon-Haiyan-large

This animated image of Typhoon Haiyan via NASA:

typhoon-haiyan

Here’s another animated image from NASA:

vis_lalo-animated

More images via NASA:

Typhoon Haiyan (Credit: NASA image courtesy LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.)

Typhoon Haiyan (Credit: NASA image courtesy LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.)

Typhoon Haiyan (Credit: NASA image courtesy LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.)

Typhoon Haiyan (Credit: NASA image courtesy LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Mike
Carlowicz.)

Detailed Imagery of Super Typhoon Haiyan's Eye The Suomi NPP satellite captured an incredibly detailed infrared image of Super Typhoon Haiyan's eye as it orbited over the storm at approximately 05:25 UTC on November 7, 2013. The entirety of the storm is actually cut-off by this and the previous orbit. This situation would normally result in reduced satellite data quality at the edges of the sensor scan. However, the VIIRS instrument has minimal data quality degradation at the scan edges, resulting in such highly detailed images. (Credit: NASA/NOAA)

Detailed Imagery of Super Typhoon Haiyan’s Eye
The Suomi NPP satellite captured an incredibly detailed infrared image of Super Typhoon Haiyan’s eye as it orbited over the storm at approximately 05:25 UTC on November 7, 2013. The entirety of the storm is actually cut-off by this and the previous orbit. This situation would normally result in reduced satellite data quality at the edges of the sensor scan. However, the VIIRS instrument has minimal data quality degradation at the scan edges, resulting in such highly detailed images. (Credit: NASA/NOAA)

A strong and dangerous typhoon is approaching the Philippines from the east. The track of the storm has the eyewall entering the Leyte Gulf near 00Z on November 8, 2013 with minimal decrease in ferocity. Due to the extremely favorable environmental conditions and recent intensification Haiyan is expected to remain at super typhoon intensity over the next 24 hours. This image was taken by the Japan Meteorological Agency's MTSAT at 0630Z on November 7, 2013. (Credit: NOAA)

A strong and dangerous typhoon is approaching the Philippines from the east. The track of the storm has the eyewall entering the Leyte Gulf near 00Z on November 8, 2013 with minimal decrease in ferocity. Due to the extremely favorable environmental conditions and recent intensification Haiyan is expected to remain at super typhoon intensity over the next 24 hours. This image was taken by the Japan Meteorological Agency’s MTSAT at 0630Z on November 7, 2013. (Credit: NOAA)

This image shows some of the islands at the mouth of the Leyte Gulf in the Philippines through the eye of Super Typhoon Haiyan. This imagery is of water vapor as measured in the infrared spectrum from the Japan Meteorological Agency's MTSAT geostationary satellite, taken at 2030Z on November 7, 2013. (Credit: NOAA)

This image shows some of the islands at the mouth of the Leyte Gulf in the Philippines through the eye of Super Typhoon Haiyan. This imagery is of water vapor as measured in the infrared spectrum from the Japan Meteorological Agency’s MTSAT geostationary satellite, taken at 2030Z on November 7, 2013. (Credit: NOAA)


Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Instagram | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the Executive Editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown; and has worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, and as a stringer for the Economist. He is a frequent TV pundit, having appeared on the O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline, AM Joy & Reliable Sources, among others. John lives in Washington, DC. .

Share This Post

© 2018 AMERICAblog Media, LLC. All rights reserved. · Entries RSS