Freakishly real drawing of a potato chip bag (video)

A really neat trompe l’oeil artist who draws everyday things, a la Andy Warhol, and makes them look 100% real, like you could reach out and grab them.

trompe-l'oeil-potato-chip-bag

I’ve always wished I could draw like this, but alas, the gods empowered me with the photographic eye, and not the artist’s hand.

I’ve always felt that photography and drawing were similar creative skills, but on different ends of the spectrum. The photographer recognizes beauty hiding in the shadows where people might not otherwise notice it, whereas the painter (like an interior designer, really) excels at creating beauty. While the photographer discovers the beauty that’s already there, the painter realizes the potential for beauty, and builds on that potential.

That’s a long way of saying that I don’t know if I ever could excel at drawing. My mom is an artist. Sister was too. And brother is an architect, while other sis had always thought of going into interior design (and dad is a great photographer as well). So we all seem to have the creative gene. But I do wonder if we all have different versions of them.


Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown (1989); and worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, and as a stringer for the Economist. Frequent TV pundit: O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline & Reliable Sources. Bio, .

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  • cole3244

    you complicate a simple reality.

  • Monoceros Forth

    Being gay in my experience didn’t take any more practice than being male
    or Caucasian (is there a better term than that?) or human.

    Well, certain aspects may require some practice. :p But it occurs to me that the same is true of being male &c.

  • emjayay

    I remember the first time I saw aluminum foil on commercial on a color TV (it was a long time ago). I was so surprised by how it actually looked metallic. But of course anything is just light and color. The Black and white TV was leaving out the color part that qualifies it as metallic in our visual experience.

    The car at least as far as you can see here doesn’t look as good, but it is a big thing drawn small, and the other things aren’t drawn as radically smaller than the real object.

  • emjayay

    To some degree. But it is also that the person is interested in doing that and has spent probably thousands of hours working on technique. Did you notice how many different mediums he used? You could pay a lot of people a lot of money to sit and spend say 40 hours a week for a year or two learning how to do this and they could do it. But no doubt it was the guy’s personal interest in drawing that led him to develop the skill. Interest plus time more than some magical inborn talent.

    This is true for a lot of things, particularly physical skills. It doesn’t mean that anyone can be Rudolph Nureyev or Sergei Rachmaninov (hey wait those are both Russians), but a lot of people could be pretty good. Not many have the passion and opportunity to put in the extrodinary work and time.

  • http://www.rebeccamorn.com/mind BeccaM

    If you let the video play all the way to the end, you can see a whole bunch of other things Marcello Barenghi has drawn in his hyper-realistic technique.

    They’re all great, but I’m especially impressed by the copper jug and the Guinness can.

  • Indigo

    4 hours and 36 minutes in real time. I liked that, he has an interesting technique and spent way more time and patience at it than I would have. It’s nice to watch an artist work, even in quick time format.

  • cole3244

    talent like that is something one is born with not unlike say sexual preference, are you listening homophobes and haters.

  • houstonray

    The talent of some people never ceases to amaze me.

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