Cats stealing dogs’ beds (pretty darn funny video)

Cats stealing dogs’ beds, a video compilation from HuffPost. It’s far funnier, and cuter, than it sounds.

It’s really kind of distressing to watch these obviously nice dogs that have no idea what to do, now that the cat has stolen their beds.

And the cats’ reactions are priceless, and classic. And in the end, the dogs win – kind of.

Really a fun video. Trust me on this.

cat-steals-dogs-bed

 

 


Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown (1989); and worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, and as a stringer for the Economist. Frequent TV pundit: O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline & Reliable Sources. Bio, .

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  • Karen

    My cat (pictured above) is an anarchist.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    I thought of that, but I’m certain that my cat believes in government, as long as she is the despotic dictator.

  • http://adgitadiaries.com/ karmanot

    I think of them as Libertarians.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    No, they’re definitely socialists or perhaps communists. Everything is theirs.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    That may be what Her Majesty is doing. As soon as someone knocks on my door or rings the doorbell, she runs to the door. She then plops down on the floor and begins rolling.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    I recognize that look. It means, “Help me!”

  • http://AMERICAblog.com/ John Aravosis

    Chris’ cat Sushi would race to any one of his “petting stations” we’d call them, where basically he knew you were going to pet him, so he races there to get you to pet him

  • http://AMERICAblog.com/ John Aravosis

    So, cats are Tea Partyers right?

  • http://AMERICAblog.com/ John Aravosis

    And I love how the dog just sort of sits nearby, in silent protest, or fear, or resignation.

  • Karen

    Great video. Been there.

  • arcadesproject

    The cats win sometimes, the dogs win sometimes and sometimes the cats and dogs kind of reach an accommodation and they both win. We could maybe send this video to Congress.

  • Cletus

    She’s really very sweet, and even though she outweighs Paco by ten or fifteen pounds, it’s more a case of not noticing he’s even there than indifference. She’d gladly share.

  • http://AMERICAblog.com/ John Aravosis

    I love the cat just looking the other way, “I’m sorry, did someone say something?”

  • http://adgitadiaries.com/ karmanot

    Bodhi dog does that to me too. In the evening I climb into bed to do a little TV watching and then no sooner that I have to go…..Bodhi climbs the bed stairs and nestles into the warm spot and falls a sleep. I wouldn’t have it any other way. Except he snores.

  • keirmeister

    I’m working at my desk, comfortably typing away on my leather-ish executive chair. I get up to pour myself another vodka lemonade, returning in less than a minute. My comfy chair has been claimed.

    I am outraged! “My chair!” I exclaim to my kitty. She simply looks up at me as if to say, “What? Why are you yelling? I’m trying to get some sleep!”

  • olandp

    I have two Pomeranians and two cats. The male Pom is very easy going while the female thinks everything is hers (exactly like my sisters.) I had to buy three dog beds for my bedroom in case the 29 pound cat decides to sleep in one. The dogs play musical beds all night, I just wish I could sleep until 9 some days.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    OMG! My cat will race me when she sees me heading for my “reading” chair. I’ve almost sat on her a couple of times.

  • milli2

    Mine too, and then there’s the whiskers brushing up against your face all night. Like Chinese water torture.

  • milli2

    Oh my God that was too funny. Don’t know what it is with cats. One of my cats always takes my spot on the couch when I get up, and the other is always on my bed when I’m ready to get in. There must be some secret cat revolt going on. I love them though.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    One of my favorite cat quotes, “My husband said it was him or the cat… I miss him sometimes.” ~Anonymous

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    My cat loves the pillow also. She’s nice enough to just curl around my head. Of course, when she starts purring, it sounds like a jack hammer.

  • Cletus

    Same in our house. Paco gets no respect…

  • http://FreakoutNation.com/ Anomaly 100

    Goldens are the bestest dogs ever. I had one. I loved that doggy.

  • Bomer

    I can relate to the dogs since my two cats treat me the same way. My bed is more than big enough for me and them (although it’s rare for them to both be on the bed at the same time) but they aren’t happy until they have practically pushed me off the bed and the lion’s share of it is theirs.

    Thankfully these two aren’t as bad as my last cat. She would wait until I was asleep then get up and slowly push my head off the pillow. I would wake up in the morning with my head at an odd angle and with a stiff neck and my cat would be stretched full out on the pillow sound asleep (and snoring).

  • ethelpbb

    Shoppers areShoppers are more likely to buy a product from a different location when a pleasant sound coming from a particular direction draws attention to the item, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. “Suppose that you are standing in a supermarket aisle, choosing between two packets of cookies, one placed nearer your right side and the other nearer your left. While you are deciding, you hear an in-store announcement from your left, about store closing hours,” write authors Hao Shen (Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Jaideep Sengupta (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology). “Will this announcement, which is quite irrelevant to the relative merits of the two packets of cookies, influence your decision?”

    In the example above, most consumers would choose the cookies on the left because consumers find it easier to visually process a product when it is presented in the same spatial direction as the auditory signal, and people tend to like things they find easy to process.

    In one lab study, consumers were asked to form an impression of pictures of two hotel rooms on a computer screen, one of which was at the right of the screen and the other at the left, while listening to a news bulletin from a speaker placed on either side. Consumers found it easier to process the picture of hotel room located in the direction of the news and also indicated a greater preference for that room. In another study, consumers were more likely to choose soft drinks from a vending machine that broadcast a local news bulletin.

    But things get a little more complicated if the signal is one we wish to avoid, like an unpleasant noise. In that case, people first turn their attention to the unpleasant noise in order to decipher the signal. Then avoidance kicks in as they voluntarily turn their attention away from the unpleasant signal.

    In another set of studies, consumers examined pictures of two restaurants while listening to either annoying or pleasant music that came from their left or right side. The music was played for either a very short time (20 seconds) or a relatively long one (1.5 minutes). “The predicted impairment effect was observed when the unpleasant music was played for a longer time — now, it was the picture in the direction away from the music that was preferred,” the authors conclude. more likely to buy a product from a different location when a pleasant sound coming from a particular direction draws attention to the item, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. “Suppose that you are standing in a supermarket aisle, choosing between two packets of cookies, one placed nearer your right side and the other nearer your left. While you are deciding, you hear an in-store announcement from your left, about store closing hours,” write authors Hao Shen (Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Jaideep Sengupta (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology). “Will this announcement, which is quite irrelevant to the relative merits of the two packets of cookies, influence your decision?”

    In the example above, most consumers would choose the cookies on the left because consumers find it easier to visually process a product when it is presented in the same spatial direction as the auditory signal, and people tend to like things they find easy to process.

    In one lab study, consumers were asked to form an impression of pictures of two hotel rooms on a computer screen, one of which was at the right of the screen and the other at the left, while listening to a news bulletin from a speaker placed on either side. Consumers found it easier to process the picture of hotel room located in the direction of the news and also indicated a greater preference for that room. In another study, consumers were more likely to choose soft drinks from a vending machine that broadcast a local news bulletin.

    But things get a little more complicated if the signal is one we wish to avoid, like an unpleasant noise. In that case, people first turn their attention to the unpleasant noise in order to decipher the signal. Then avoidance kicks in as they voluntarily turn their attention away from the unpleasant signal.

    In another set of studies, consumers examined pictures of two restaurants while listening to either annoying or pleasant music that came from their left or right side. The music was played for either a very short time (20 seconds) or a relatively long one (1.5 minutes). “The predicted impairment effect was observed when the unpleasant music was played for a longer time — now, it was the picture in the direction away from the music that was preferred,” the authors conclude.

  • Mike_in_the_Tundra

    Our cat totally owned our Golden, but they really seemed to love one another. They would never have fought over the bed, because the cat always slept on the dog or between his paws.

  • http://FreakoutNation.com/ Anomaly 100

    I have two cats. The female owns the male. She takes his bed, his world, his heart, and now he’s a wreck. He’s in love.

  • cole3244

    great video, cats & dogs solve their problems we should take a lesson from them.

  • http://AMERICAblog.com/ John Aravosis

    I know! I was really surprised at HOW good this is.

  • http://FreakoutNation.com/ Anomaly 100

    I love this. That ginger cat is all, “This is mine NOW!”

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