Because he didn’t orgasm, it’s not rape – USC allegedly told student

A student at the the University of Southern California claims that the school’s Department of Public Safety told her that they would not pursue a rape case because her alleged assailant did not orgasm while penetrating her.

The Huffington Post has confirmed that the Department of Education’s Civil Rights Division is “investigating allegations the university failed to prosecute and adjudicate claims of sexual violence and to respond promptly to complaints of harassment on campus.”  HuffPo adds that “such failures would be violations of Title IX, a federal gender equality law.”

Another complainant says that campus police refused to pursue a rape case against her boyfriend, even though he had allegedly admitted the crime on tape, because the university’s goal is to be “educative” about rape, not “punitive.”

And according to the LA Times, two students filed a complaint with the federal government alleging that over 100 students have detailed cases in which USC has alleged rape and sexual assault cases.

The local NBC station in LA has more on the coverage, including one woman who says the school refused to transfer her to another class after she accused a classmate of raping her.


Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Instagram | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the Executive Editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown; and has worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, and as a stringer for the Economist. He is a frequent TV pundit, having appeared on the O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline, AM Joy & Reliable Sources, among others. John lives in Washington, DC. .

Share This Post

108 Responses to “Because he didn’t orgasm, it’s not rape – USC allegedly told student”

  1. 8403shadyops says:

    there is always more to the story, unless you are there, all we have is hearsay and documentation available, that is why we need honest men and women, so hard to come by and keep!

  2. 8403shadyops says:

    break the law in my grid and i will take a giant dump on you! semper fi female cats!

  3. shawnthesheep says:

    Is it illegal to wait to report you were the victim of a crime? No it is not. If the crime is within the statute of limitations, the police have an obligation to investigate the alleged crime. It’s never illegal to report a crime.

  4. shawnthesheep says:

    It’s not at all suspect for sexual assault victims to wait to file complaints against their assailants for long periods of time. Perhaps you should take the time to learn something about the psychological trauma and stigma surrounding sexual assault before spewing your ignorant opinions around like they have merit.

    You are picking apart a single case when there seems to be a pattern of covering up rape at USC. That might seem odd to you, but it happens all the time. It’s happening at colleges across the country. No school wants to get a reputation for being unsafe. They all want to keep their sexual assault stats as low as possible.

    To immediately suggest that the girl is just trying to get back at her boyfriend seems to be more than just a little misogynistic.

  5. shawnthesheep says:

    Across the country, students are reporting that universities have been going out of their way to cover up rapes and not prosecute them. The universities seems to be more concerned with PR and maintaining their reputation then ensuring the safety of their students.

    And no matter how many times similar stories are reported, there are always commenters like you that insist there must be more to the story. Because institutions never mistreat women or try to cover up sexual assaults, right? All we have to do is look at the US Armed Forces to know that this sort of institutional coverup of sexual assault NEVER happens.

  6. recon says:

    welcome to my country…it’s not perfect…watch your six!

  7. recon says:

    unfortunately it happens way more than we think!

    lets do our part, affect those around you with positive intellectual logical and moral compass!

    stick your dick in my daughter against her will and you will dissapear, I promise that!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dd0_ZYtBVkc

  8. Denver Catboy says:

    Trollololololololololololololololololololololololol….

  9. ehmkec says:

    “Just one person’s word that a crime has occurred, with nothing else to corroborate it, is simply not enough”

    The crime still happened and now the victim is alone. A thorn in the side of a system that seems to only exist for itself. Just telling a victim to get lost is not enough. The system does not exist for itself. It is supposedly there for the people. Maybe something like – ” We don’t have evidence to proceed within the ‘justice’ side but (rose-colored glasses on) we have a support system. We can help you get through this. (rose-colored glasses off)

    I am so sick of hearing about crap that should not be happening. Hospitals dumping patients, cities enacting laws to punish homeless even further, laws put in place to aggravate political enemies. Towns passing laws requiring gun ownership, laws prohibiting front yard gardens, teenage girls dying because a religious barrier prevents proper health procedures. Murder/suicide with toddlers, foreclosures on the wrong house, Doctors who say they won’t treat liberals, scholars that constantly scold. Judges that hate the poor.

    ”l’art pour l’art” only not.

    I feel like a motherless child and I feel like Peter Finch.

    Where can I buy a fire-proof hand-basket ? – Thank you.

  10. Jodi p says:

    And what makes you think that?

  11. IKNOW says:

    yes, it makes more sense that a rape victim will go straight to the hospital or police. I used to ask the same questions, Ninong. That is until I went through it myself. I never went to the police because I was too afraid and ashamed. I was raped by my boyfriend and didn’t know what to do. Million of women are raped by their own husbands. It’s easy to say rape victims should report it as soon as it happens, but its a lot harder than you think.

  12. Naja pallida says:

    Of course a crime is a crime, but my point was that it takes the effort, resources and time of many people to investigate and prosecute any crime, and prosecutors sometimes have to make the choice of whether there is enough of a case to be presented. Just one person’s word that a crime has occurred, with nothing else to corroborate it, is simply not enough. There needs to be evidence the crime occurred, or barring that, at least multiple people who have the same story. The system certainly isn’t perfect, and Dog only knows how many crimes fall through the cracks on technicalities or insufficiently convincing testimony, but it’s the system we’ve got.

  13. America2014 says:

    10X more corrupt?

    Not 9X or 11X?

  14. America2014 says:

    “I’d say USC has just set itself up for significant civil class-action lawsuits..”

    Only if the media report is factual, and not skewed

  15. America2014 says:

    “Another complainant says that campus police refused to pursue a rape
    case against her boyfriend, even though he had allegedly admitted the
    crime on tape, because the university’s goal is to be “educative” about
    rape, not “punitive.”

    The campus police may have refused to pursue a rape case in this instance, but I doubt that the reason stated in this sentence is the true and only reason. I’ll bet there is more to the story.

  16. America2014 says:

    “Another complainant says that campus police refused to pursue a rape
    case against her boyfriend, even though he had allegedly admitted the
    crime on tape, because the university’s goal is to be “educative” about
    rape, not “punitive.”

    This seems very unlikely.

  17. America2014 says:

    “A student at the the University of Southern California claims that the
    school’s Department of Public Safety told her that they would not pursue
    a rape case because her alleged assailant did not orgasm while
    penetrating her.”

    This seems unlikely.

  18. America2014 says:

    IFF the allegations are true

  19. Whitewitch says:

    Oh totally karmanot. I know men and particularly boys are also victims of rape. Sadly….

  20. ehmkec says:

    This case aside, isn’t a crime still a crime even if no one reports it? No evidence does not mean a criminal is innocent. I believe there is “Law” and there is “Justice”. The latter is rare.

  21. 1jetpackangel says:

    It’s been over five years and I still have a hard time even THINKING the words “he raped me.” The idea of discussing it with somebody else makes me want to curl up under my bedcovers with a teddy bear and my machined metal baton. So yeah, I can understand why she waited before reporting it.

  22. evan_la says:

    Oh, you’re one of those. Nevermind then. Bugger off and do your own research.

  23. Ninong says:

    This is California Penal Code 801.1 in its entirety: http://www.weblaws.org/california/codes/ca_penal_section_801.1
    It does not say what you claim it says.

  24. evan_la says:

    Polish up your Google-fu, young Ninong:

    IANAL, but it looks like CA Penal Code 801.1, says, with a few exceptions, 10 years from the date of occurrence to file a criminal complaint for rape. Extensions for, paraphrasing here, DNA evidence discovery, or rape of a minor.

    Seems in conflict with the statute of limitations for prosecution, but there you go, IANAL.

  25. Ninong says:

    Okay, I guess that answers my question. I know that many states, including California, recently made retroactive changes to their statutes of limitations on crimes of sexual abuse of minors but I didn’t know what the rules are, if any, on how long one can wait before telling the police you have been raped if you were an adult at the time of the alleged rape and knew the identity of your rapist.

    Yes, I imagine it might be difficult to convince a DA to bring charges against your former boyfriend for an alleged rape that happened more than two years ago. Naturally people will wonder if maybe there is a revenge motive somewhere in the mix.

  26. Naja pallida says:

    I’m not a lawyer, but to my understanding there is no specific time limit on filing a criminal complaint, and they usually give plenty of leeway when it comes to sexual assault and domestic abuse cases. As long as the statute of limitations hasn’t run out, theoretically the charges can still be pursued. The ultimate problem is simply evidence. No prosecutor is going to want to go ahead with a he-said/she-said case, with no physical evidence nor corroborating testimony, and even if they did try to pursue it, it is unlikely it would get by a grand jury. Not to say stranger things haven’t happened in our justice system.

  27. karmanot says:

    Sojourners standing together!

  28. Ninong says:

    Evan, I already know what the statute of limitations is in California. I think you must have misunderstood my question. I didn’t ask the “statute of limitations,” I asked if there is a “limitations period to file a criminal complaint.”

    I’m not talking about filing charges, which is what the DA does and which is limited by the statute of limitations, I’m asking how long the victim has to report the alleged rape. Obviously, in the interest of justice and in potentially preventing the rapist from harming other women, the crime should be reported to the police as soon as possible. In this particular case, the alleged crime happened in 2010 but it wasn’t reported until December 2012.

  29. evan_la says:

    Google is your friend:

    “While the statutes of limitations for prosecuting a sexual assault or
    rape case differ between states, in California suspects may be tried up
    to six years after the crime was committed. In cases of aggravated rape
    that carry a lifetime sentence, there is no statute of limitations,
    and in cases that carry fewer than eight years in prison, the statute
    of limitations is lowered to three years. (Cal.Penal Code § 799-801)”

  30. Ninong says:

    Okay, but is it legal? What is the limitations period for filing a criminal complaint of rape? Not statutory rape but rape of an adult woman by an adult man? How long can the woman wait before filing a criminal complaint?

    Here’s how the L.A. Times article starts out:

    “A USC student said Monday that she believes university officials performed a shoddy investigation when she told them last year that she had been raped by her then-boyfriend in 2010.

    “Tucker Reed, who has blogged extensively about her alleged rape, said that she informed USC officials about the incident in December 2012, after she told police. But school officials told Reed, who recently finished her junior year, that they could not do anything because there was not enough evidence.”

    Is the L.A. Times correct? Did Ms Reed wait until December 2012 to report an alleged rape that happened sometime in 2010? How long can the victim legally wait? This was not statutory rape, just regular rape of one adult by another. How long can she legally wait?

    Does anybody know? It’s a simple legal question, that’s all.

  31. Ninong says:

    Jane, I understand that; however, I’m wondering if there is a limitations period for filing a criminal complaint of rape in California. There is a statute of limitations for filing charges but that’s not my point.

    According to the L.A. Times article that John linked above, Tucker Reed filed her complaint with the police and with the university in December 2012 for an alleged rape that took place in 2010. The alleged rapist was her then-boyfriend.

    We’re not talking about statutory rape or anything like that, we’re talking about non-consensual sexual intercourse by force or threat of force perpetrated upon an adult woman by an adult man. How long does the woman have legally to file a criminal complaint in the state of California?

  32. samizdat says:

    I lol’d!

  33. karmanot says:

    And there is that great iceberg unseen for the most part. Men and boys who have been raped.

  34. karmanot says:

    Yep

  35. karmanot says:

    “Wouldn’t it make sense” Nothing about rape makes sense living in the trauma of shame and blame.

  36. karmanot says:

    That doesn’t seem at all odd to me and I might even say ‘normal’ in many cases, considering the chauvinism and misogyny that colors police and authoritarian culture.

  37. Jane C. says:

    Ninong, a person who is raped feels shame, even though they were the victim of a crime. Unfortunately, there are plenty of idiots out there who blame the victim for being raped. Not to mention enduring a rape kit to collect evidence then retelling what happened in a court room would feel like another violation. Top that off by others making them feel like they could have worn something different, took a different route, stayed home, defended themselves, etc. Even though the victim did nothing ILLEGAL! However, the rapist certainly did! Is it any wonder why some victims need time to work up the courage, and some never report it at all.

  38. Ninong says:

    Rape is non-consensual sexual intercourse by force or threats of force. Wouldn’t it make sense for the victim to report it to the police immediately and proceed to the nearest hospital for examination and collection of potential DNA evidence? Wouldn’t that make more sense if the victim wants to see justice done?

    Tucker Reed, the woman at the microphone and the one who filed the complaint, alleges that she was raped in 2010 by her then-boyfriend. She made this allegation to the police and then to university authorities in December 2012. So my question now is, how long can an adult woman in the state of California wait before deciding to report an alleged rape? Is there a law governing that?

  39. AdmNaismith says:

    USC is private, not part of the UC or Cal Sate systems.

    This is probably why they think they can so easily get away with stuff like this. There is not necessarily any higher authority for them.

  40. Zack Baker says:

    Waiting a year has nothing to do with it. Some people feel ashamed or afraid. There are a lot of unreported rape cases out there and whats even worse there are a lot of unsolved cases out there because the police never ran the evidence which is another factor for not reporting it. And some people dont want to go through the public humiliation of a trial… so saying that waiting a year is odd isn’t

  41. Whitewitch says:

    Namaste Zorba – may you too travel in Peace!

  42. Ninong says:

    Tucker Reed, the blonde woman doing the talking and the one who filed the complaint, may be trying to “get even” with her former boyfriend. She didn’t notify the university of her alleged rape until December 2012, even though it took place in 2010. The university told her there was not enough evidence. It seems to me that waiting more than a year to file a complaint with the police and the university is more than a little suspect.

    If a woman is raped, that’s a terrible thing that is inexcusable, but waiting more than a year to file a complaint seems odd to me.

  43. Zorba says:

    Oh, Whitewitch, I am so very, very sorry about what happened to you. Many hugs and best wishes to you, from me.
    And I agree, way too many men still do not “get it.” Not just in colleges, or in the military, but everywhere.
    Namaste, my sister. May you have peace.

  44. Zorba says:

    Of course, as I noted previously.

  45. Zorba says:

    This goes on in a whole lot of colleges, K. Not just the NCAA Division 1 schools, either, although they seem to make up a lot of the malefactors.

  46. karmanot says:

    Yep I’m waiting for Notre Dame.

  47. Ninong says:

    All I can say is that those guys had better not go to Sweden. Boy, would they be in for a surprise! Julian Assange has been charged with rape in spite of the fact that both women admitted they willingly slept with him nude. Both women admitted the sex was consensual but claim that he took advantage of them without their full consent after the consensual part.

    The original Swedish prosecutor said it wasn’t rape but then a couple of weeks later a different Swedish prosecutor said it could be rape. Neither of the women filed a complaint until weeks after the event. Both of them were local WikiLeaks volunteers. Both of them actually bragged about bedding Assange to their girlfriends the day after!!

    In one case the allegation of rape is based on the fact that the condom split during the intercourse and in the second case it’s based on the allegation that the second act of intercourse took place later in the night while the woman was half-asleep, therefore without her full consent. Neither woman complained until after she was contacted by the authorities, who were obviously looking for a way to get Assange.

    In other words, in the first case the “rape” part is based on the sex that took place after the condom split and in the second case it’s based on the second act of intercourse that took place while the woman was half-asleep.

    “Rape victim #1” threw a party for Assange the evening after the alleged rape incident from which she tweeted: “Sitting outdoors at 02:00 and hardly freezing with the coolest, smartest people! It’s amazing.” She invited Assange to stay with her afterwards.

    Do not sleep with anyone in Sweden! You might be charged with rape a month later even if it was consensual sex!

  48. Zorba says:

    How about Penn State and the Jerry Sandusky scandal? That certainly went all the way to the top, and had gone on for years, with everyone looking the other way.

  49. Zorba says:

    Well, it worked for the US military, too, for a long, long time. And it’s only now getting some publicity.

  50. Zorba says:

    One thing that Son Zorba noted was, “I wonder how many of the (alleged) rapists were athletes?” He pointed out that USC is a huge NCAA school, and that a whole lot of the athletic powerhouses in the NCAA Division 1 have been known to sweep the transgressions of their athletes under the rug. I have no idea who the alleged rapists were, but it’s another interesting speculation, which I had not thought of.

  51. cole3244 says:

    the curve and those being tested must be moving in the opposite direction or so it seems.

  52. Zorba says:

    True, but way too many colleges and universities do the same type of thing. The people at the top may well not have known about these particular cases, but I am thinking that those lower on the totem pole, so to speak, knew damned well that the powers that be would not be happy if the university’s name was sullied by too many rapes (and other criminal cases) being publicized.
    I don’t know about other parents, but when my two kids were in high school and thinking about which colleges to attend, I certainly tried to learn about how safe the campuses were, and I’m betting that a lot of parents do the same thing. Not to mention the fact that at least some potential donors to the school would be put off by a lot of bad publicity.
    I certainly hope that USC “cleans house.”

  53. karmanot says:

    “these idiots in the Department of Public Safety” They would probably get in a mire for days about whether to put out red cones or yellow cones around the site in contention.

  54. karmanot says:

    Or think the Simpson’s is a reality show.

  55. karmanot says:

    Perhaps, but never over estimate the integrity of the UC system, nor under estimate its history of venality and corruption.

  56. MyrddinWilt says:

    Well first of all, be careful not to assume that the actions of one cop are USC policy. It is very unlikely that this policy is something the people at the top knew about or endorsed.

    On the other hand the civil case is certainly alleging a lot more than one ignorant cop.

    Quite often these cases are brought to force institutions to clean house. I suspect that it will turn out that this policy was driven by some manager who decided a coverup would be best for their career.

    We don’t have any evidence yet, but I strongly suspect Monoceros Forth below is onto something and this was an attempt to cover up for some big name athlete. Maybe it is time to tell some of these colleges that they can’t have an athletics program at all.

  57. karmanot says:

    “I’d say USC has just set itself up for significant civil class-action lawsuits..” It wouldn’t be the first time, but believe me the system has endless deep pockets and is 10X more corrupt than the State of Louisiana.

  58. Whitewitch says:

    I got the irony Indigo…sadly this is a very upsetting issue for many women. We feel so sad and angry and frustrated that it is 2013 and MEN don’t get what rape is and how horribly it affects the raped person. I am 58 and still am affected by my own abuse. Maybe irony should have a ::snark:: in the statement.

  59. Indigo says:

    Here on the Peninsula de Flori-dada, the average hovers closer to 75. Maybe.

  60. Indigo says:

    LOL !!!

  61. Zorba says:

    Yes, exactly, Mike.

  62. Mike_in_the_Tundra says:

    Basically IQ is based on a bell curve, and that curve moves over time.

  63. Dave of the Jungle says:

    That’s the normally distributed population, by definition.

  64. cole3244 says:

    if the average IQ in america is 100 then we must be grading on a curve because the dumbing down of america since the reagan revolution has not been taken into account.

  65. BeccaM says:

    All I can figure is someone or several someones in the USC administration said to themselves, “Well, denials and coverups worked for the Catholic Church for all those decades. What could possibly go wrong?”

  66. NCMan says:

    the real question is if and when did she ever say YES. If she never said YES, it doesn’t matter when she said no because without her initial consent, he had no reason to penetrate her.

  67. tomtallis says:

    Makes me ashamed to be an alumnus of USC.

  68. UncleBucky says:

    What’s yours?

  69. UncleBucky says:

    How far below 100 can a person watch Fox News and know it’s not Barney?

  70. UncleBucky says:

    “to orgasm” (Verb?) OMG. What next… ;o)

  71. Whitewitch says:

    May I suggest that the head of the Department of Public Safety take a broom handle up/in/out of any and/or all of his orifice(s) and let me know if that is icky. Then perhaps HE (I presume it is a HE) will have a better understanding of exactly what rape is. Ohhh…I hope that was not too rude!

  72. Mighty says:

    Wow. What can anyone say to this. Is there a more powerful word than stupid?

  73. BeccaM says:

    The USC didn’t just slip up. USC’s apparently official policy of dissuading rape victims from properly reporting the crimes committed against them is itself a crime.

    If nothing else, as I’m fond of saying, the civil lawsuits are writing themselves.

  74. Zorba says:

    It does seem that way, cole. But you have to remember that, when IQ tests are developed and normed, the normative sample defines the median IQ as 100. Which means that if an entire population has gotten stupider, the median IQ will still be 100. IQ is, basically, only what an IQ test measures. It does have predictive value for how most people will do in school, for example, and to a certain extent, job performance and income. But it’s not really a measure of global intelligence, common sense, ethics, flexibility, creativity, willingness to learn and adapt, and a whole range of other things. There are plenty of people who would measure at least “average,” or even one or two or three standard deviations above the mean, who are rigid and reactionary in their thinking. If someone has a tested IQ, for instance, of 100 or 120 or 130, but does not educate him or herself and is stubborn and unwilling to learn and abandon his or her prejudices, then IQ doesn’t mean a damned thing.

  75. BeccaM says:

    I’d say USC has just set itself up for significant civil class-action lawsuits…

    Sadly, they’re not the only college or university to have done this, to try to hide the rapes and sexual assaults against its female students. (Nor the only organization to adopt policies of victim-blaming and cover-ups in the face of gross sexual malfeasance and crimes. Putting PR and image ahead of victims.

    MyrddinWilt is correct: The law could not be more clear. “Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to complete the crime.” What that means is a person — be they male or female — can be charged with felony rape even if all they did was stick their finger or some foreign object into a person’s ass or into a woman’s vagina without prior consent or continued to do so after previously given consent was rescinded.

    When someone reports having been raped, the correct, legal response is not to tell them, contrary to the law as written, that they weren’t actually raped and they shouldn’t pursue it — and worse, as we’ve seen reported in some cases, to suffer retaliation if they go public. You’re supposed to call the police, period, end-of.

    Any other response, especially these blatant attempts to cover up crimes, is considered complicity after the fact. And if it is systematic — that is, an official policy — it’s criminal conspiracy and obstruction of justice.

  76. karmanot says:

    Don’t forget down arrow trolls with IQ’s. of 10 :-)

  77. karmanot says:

    Bingo

  78. karmanot says:

    Except when he is a black youth running from a killer and gets murdered because he looks like a black criminal.

  79. karmanot says:

    I’m suggesting she said ‘Yes’ when his supporters put their heads up his ass.

  80. karmanot says:

    Drop a zero and maybe.

  81. karmanot says:

    Right on Myrddin

  82. Zorba says:

    Exactly so, Myrddin. “Any sexual penetration.” Apparently, there is at least one commenter on this thread who does not understand this, unfortunately.
    And I do not know what the hell USC was thinking in these cases. I suspect that they would rather not have involved the Los Angeles legal system, because that would make the university look bad, or some such. “Educative” about rape, not “punitive.” Really, USC? Yes, certainly educate the entire student population to try and prevent future rapes, but prosecute the rapists.

  83. MyrddinWilt says:

    Really stupid and dumb and so are some of the troll comments here supporting the USC ignoramus.

    The California penal code could hardly be more explicit.

    http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=pen&group=00001-01000&file=261-269
    263. The essential guilt of rape consists in the outrage to the
    person and feelings of the victim of the rape. Any sexual
    penetration, however slight, is sufficient to complete the crime.

    This has been settled in common law for a very long time. There was a case in the UK a couple of decades ago in which a guy continued sex after the girl said stop and was convicted because even though common law holds that the act of rape is complete upon penetration, that only means that penetration is sufficient. The act of penetration is not finished until the man withdraws.

    Absent a US court precedent interpreting the California statute differently, a US court faced with similar facts would probably follow the logic of the Lords ruling if the prosecution made the court aware of it. Even though UK court judgements are not binding precedent in the US, they are still precedent, just like a ruling from a different court circuit is precedent but not binding precedent.

    USC seems to have slipped up in other areas:

    264.2. (a) Whenever there is an alleged violation or violations of
    subdivision (e) of Section 243, or Section 261, 261.5, 262, 273.5,
    286, 288a, or 289, the law enforcement officer assigned to the case
    shall immediately provide the victim of the crime with the “Victims
    of Domestic Violence” card, as specified in subparagraph (G) of
    paragraph (9) of subdivision (c) of Section 13701.

  84. cole3244 says:

    i guess that means if you use a revolver in a robbery but don’t discharge a round you haven’t committed an armed robbery, tell that to the lapd.

  85. cole3244 says:

    no way the average IQ in america is 100, that doesn’t meet the eye or common sense test.

  86. Buford says:

    She said ‘No’ before he started… that’s what made it rape, Brainiac.

  87. Monoceros Forth says:

    I don’t think you know what “trolling” is either.

  88. voltronforce says:

    Thanks for your Trollish post.

  89. Zorba says:

    True. But, as I recall (from when I majored in psychology, back in prehistorical times), it so happens that, as far as IQ scores are concerned, both the median and the mean are 100. ;-)

  90. Monoceros Forth says:

    Look up “analogy” dumbass.

  91. discus_sucks_ass says:

    so no video that proves what she claims?

  92. discus_sucks_ass says:

    beating? that is not alleged in this case from what I read up there. Now if you want to drag in other cases that is OK, but as it is you are just trying to gin up outrage

  93. NCMan says:

    are you suggesting she said yes before he started and then said no so he stopped? Or, what are you suggesting was his indication that he should start in the first place?

  94. discus_sucks_ass says:

    but when did she say no? then or before, that is unclear. I realize it is very popular to believe what someone recalls from a traumatic experience, but sometimes what we recall is not objective fact.

  95. NCMan says:

    No, that is not what “average” means.
    The definition of average is to add ALL the IQs together and divide by the total number of people.

    The term for a number having half the population above it and half below it is “median”, not “average”.

  96. Zorba says:

    Did you read the HuffPost article linked above?

    “Because he stopped, it was not rape,” she was told, according to the complaint. “Even though his penis penetrated your vagina, because he stopped, it was not a crime.”

    His penis penetrated her vagina. He apparently did not stop before he shoved his dick inside her. Therefore, it’s rape, whether he had an orgasm or not.

  97. nicho says:

    Idiot. All rapists stop at some point, but they’re still rapists.

  98. Monoceros Forth says:

    If a guy starts beating someone savagely, then for whatever reason stops short of actually killing him, he still committed a violent crime.

  99. discus_sucks_ass says:

    to the down voter, could you link to the video she claims she has? or explain why you object to guys stopping when a woman says no?

  100. nicho says:

    No, the bad thing is that he raped her. The fact that he stopped raping her at some point is immaterial.

  101. Indigo says:

    Apparently. Things are very far off base nation-wide. Zimmerman was found “not guilty.” AmBloggers missed my irony entirely, and Snowden was foolish enough to flee to Russia, of all places.

  102. Monoceros Forth says:

    USC, huh? It’s hard to avoid wondering if the rapist was a football player.

  103. voltronforce says:

    Remember folks the average IQ is 100. Which means half the population is below 100, kind of scary isn’t it.

  104. Zorba says:

    Oy.
    So I guess if the male does have an orgasm, but is wearing a condom and leaves no semen in the woman, it’s not rape, either?
    I really wonder how these idiots in the Department of Public Safety would feel if it was their daughter or their sister? Would they tell her it really wasn’t rape?
    :-(

  105. discus_sucks_ass says:

    so he stopped when she said “no”? and that is a bad thing?

  106. Indigo says:

    So as part of the “educative” mission of the university, the campus kops explained that unless the fellow “orgasms,” it’s not “rape?” That’s classic. For some reason, the expression “I did not have sex with that woman” comes to mind. And of course that was a factual statement according to Christian teaching since the activity involved was not procreative. Oh, myyy!

© 2020 AMERICAblog Media, LLC. All rights reserved. · Entries RSS