Santorum thinks straights will stop having sex if gays can get married

I’m telling you, Rick Santorum is a big gay.  It’s the only explanation for why the man would be convinced that straight people are going to stop having sex, or something, if Adam and Steve are permitted to marry.

Though I do have to say that the award for true hatefulness goes to Republican former presidential candidate Alan Keyes who compared gay marriage to picking ones nose and eating it.  (Though it is interesting that Alan Keyes is apparently familiar with how both taste.)

But in Keyes’ defense, it’s kind of a sad time to be a homophobe (let alone, a Republican).  Much of America has moved beyond the whole gay-bashing thing.  And even Republicans are admitting that their kids are gay, and it’s okay.

Another consequence of the advance in gay rights is that Republicans and their allies in the religious right, are finally being forced to answer hard questions like “how will some gay couple marrying truly affect your marriage?”

The gay-haters going before the Supreme Court a few weeks ago, to oppose gay marriage, couldn’t come up with a good reason.  The best argument they could come up with wasn’t “here’s how gay marriage harms,” but rather to turn it around and ask civil rights advocates to prove how gay marriage “helps” foster traditional marriage.

Huh?  I didn’t realize Rick Santorum needed my help with his marriage.

Check out this snippet from the Supreme Court’s Prop 8 oral arguments, via NPR:

“At bottom,” [anti-gay lawyer] Cooper said, “same-sex couples and opposite-sex couples are simply not similarly situated,” and it is reasonable to believe that over time, the institution of marriage itself would be harmed if marriage were redefined as a “genderless institution.”

Justice Elena Kagan followed up, asking what exactly is the “harm to the institution of marriage or to opposite-sex couples? How does this cause and effect work?”

That’s not the right question to ask, Cooper responded. “The correct question is whether or not redefining marriage to include same-sex couples would advance the interests of marriage?”

That’s an absurd statement. (We’re not going to integrate the schools until you tell us how it’s going to help white students learn more.) If you’re going to ban something, the onus is on you to prove that the ban is needed, that it furthers a legitimate interest.  The very fact that the religious right can’t come up with a good reason to ban gays from marrying is pretty damning in and of itself.

Of course, GOP Justice Scalia then had to get into the action, as he always does, when his fellow Republicans are having a hard time making their case:

Justice Antonin Scalia chimed in to underline the point. “They’re arguing for a nationwide rule, which applies to states other than California, that every state must allow marriage by same-sex couples,” he said. Some states may believe same-sex marriage somehow harms traditional marriage, “but it is certainly true that there’s no scientific answer to that question at this point in time.”

Scalia got his argument from George Will.  The GOP borg decided that the message it was going to use, since it couldn’t come up with a “harm” from permitting gays to marry, was now a concern that no one knows what will happen should the gays start marrying like bunnies.  Oh the horror.  And until gays can prove what will happen should they marry, no one should let them marry.

Get it?  I won’t let you back this cake until you can prove to me that it’s delicious.  Which is hard to do if you can’t bake it in the first place.  What they’re basically admitting is that they have no evidence backing up their claim that prejudice is warranted, so now they’re trying to switch the burden to those they’re oppressing.

Of course, we have had gay marriages in America now for going on nine years and the sky has not fallen, children have not magically turned gay, and none of the harms that the religious right kept crowing about have come to past.

The same thing happened in the year and a half since Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell was repealed.  None of the things the religious right and the Republican party warned us about ever came to pass.  So maybe it’s time we stopped listening to them all together.


Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Instagram | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the Executive Editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown; and has worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, and as a stringer for the Economist. He is a frequent TV pundit, having appeared on the O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline, AM Joy & Reliable Sources, among others. John lives in Washington, DC. .

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