Qwest CEO: ‘A 100 meg is just a dream’

Uh huh, unless you live in France, Japan, South Korea or numerous other countries outside of North America where it’s existed for years. There’s something seriously wrong when this is the response that a CEO provides when asked about internet speed comparable to what many other countries already offer. It’s pathetic that lazy CEOs like this have accepted such antiquated technology for the US. The GOP did a great job destroying competition in American business and sorry excuses for leaders like this are precisely why the US is falling behind. Even in France – yes, socialist France – it’s easy to locate a number of options for high speed internet. And of course, it’s going to be cheaper than the backwards offerings that corporate America is happy to offer.

What ever happened to robust competition and giving the best to American consumers? The FCC is right to force corporate America to get off its collective duff and deliver. It’s also no wonder why customers are dumping Qwest. How much can you really expect from a blockhead CEO like they have?

Genachowski offered few details on the plan and how the FCC would get providers to reach the minimum speeds.

One, Qwest Communications International Inc, said the goal was unrealistic.

“A 100 meg is just a dream,” Qwest Chief Executive Edward Mueller told Reuters. “First, we don’t think the customer wants that. Secondly, if (Google has) invented some technology, we’d love to partner with them.”

The United States ranked 19th in broadband speed, lagging being Japan, Korea and France, according to a 2008 study by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.


An American in Paris, France. BA in History & Political Science from Ohio State. Provided consulting services to US software startups, launching new business overseas that have both IPO’d and sold to well-known global software companies. Currently launching a new cloud-based startup. Full bio here.

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