AP: “it was hard to tell who had suffered a worse evening, Bush or McCain.”

Any article with the line “it was a remarkably bad day for Republicans” in the first paragraph is going to pique my interest:

Even for a party whose president suffers dismal approval ratings, whose legislative wing lost control of Congress and whose presidential nominee trails in the polls, it was a remarkably bad day for Republicans.

The drama that unfolded yesterday wasn’t as much about the underlying policy, but on the underlying politics — internal Republican politics. Neither Bush or McCain have any leadership abilities:

By midnight, it was hard to tell who had suffered a worse evening, Bush or McCain. McCain, eager to shore up his image as a leader who rises above partisanship, was undercut by a fierce political squabble within his own party’s ranks.

The consequences could be worse for Bush, and for millions of Americans if the impasse sends financial markets tumbling, as some officials fear. Closed-door negotiations were to resume Friday, but it was unclear whether House Republicans would attend.

Republicans and Democrats alike seemed unsure which way McCain was leaning. His campaign’s statement late Thursday shed little light.

“At this moment, the plan that has been put forth by the administration does not enjoy the confidence of the American people,” it said. It was unclear whether McCain would attend Friday night’s scheduled debate against Democratic nominee Barack Obama in Oxford, Miss.

So, get this straight: McCain made a big announcement that he was suspending his campaign (which he didn’t do) and planning to bag the first debate because of the economic crisis. He swooped into D.C., caused a stir — but no one knows what his position is. That’s some kind of crazy. He hasn’t solved the problem. It’s no kind of leadership.


On October 27, 2010, Joe was one of five bloggers who interviewed President Obama. Joe is a DC-based political consultant with over twenty-five years of experience at both the state and federal level. Joe has managed political operations and legislative efforts for both candidates and issues-based organizations. For seven years, he was the Director of State Legislation at Handgun Control, Inc. He served as that organization's first Political Director during the 2000 cycle. Joe is a graduate of the University of Maine School of Law. In addition, he has a Masters in Public Administration from Lehigh University and received his B.A. from the University of New Hampshire. Joe also has a fun dog, Petey, a worthy successor to Boomer, who got Joe through eight years of Bush and Cheney. Joe likes to think he is a world class athlete having finished the 2005 Chicago Marathon in the time of 4:10. He has completed six other marathons as well -- and is still determined to break the four hour mark.

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