“If Iraq don’t kill you, Walter Reed will.”

This is the second of a two-part series from the Washington Post about the horrendous treatment our injured Iraq vets are receiving back in the US at the hands of the Bush administration (this is the first part, published Sunday). Read these snippets, or better yet, read the entire article online. It’s horrifying.

While Mologne House [one of the places recuperating soldiers are housed] has a full bar, there is not one counselor or psychologist assigned there to assist soldiers and families in crisis — an idea proposed by Walter Reed social workers but rejected by the military command that runs the post….

Then check out the treatment they gave this vet:

“They said, ‘Well, he was in Title I math,’ like he was retarded,” Annette says. “Well, y’all took him, didn’t you?”…

Dell and Annette’s closest friend at Mologne House is a 47-year-old Guard member who was driving an Army vehicle through the Iraqi night when a flash of light blinded him and he crashed into a ditch with an eight-foot drop. Among his many injuries was a broken foot that didn’t heal properly. Army doctors decided that “late life atrophy” was responsible for the foot, not the truck wreck in Iraq.

When Dell sees his medical records, he explodes. “Special ed is for the mentally retarded, and I’m not mentally retarded, right, babe?” he asks Annette. “I graduated from high school. I did some college. I worked in a steel mill.”

Yes, God forbid someone puts his life down for our country and then gets ill. Who cares if he has a pre-existing condition? Here’s a crazy idea – if you serve in a war we cover your medical care, PERIOD. I swear, these people are actually like money-grubbing insurance companies dealing with thieves. These are our solders, people. Jesus Christ.

Then there’s what they did to this guy:

Sgt. David Thomas, a gunner with the Tennessee National Guard, spent his first three months at Walter Reed with no decent clothes; medics in Samarra had cut off his uniform. Heavily drugged, missing one leg and suffering from traumatic brain injury, David, 42, was finally told by a physical therapist to go to the Red Cross office, where he was given a T-shirt and sweat pants. He was awarded a Purple Heart but had no underwear.

And then this:

His voice is oddly flat as he recalls the day his friend died in a Humvee accident. The friend was driving with another soldier when they flipped off the road into a swamp. They were trapped upside down and submerged. Steve helped pull them out and gave CPR, but it was too late. The swamp water kept pushing back into his own mouth. He rode in the helicopter with the wet bodies.

After he finished his tour, everything was fine back home in Pennsylvania for about 10 months, and then a strange bout of insomnia started. After four days without sleep, he burst into full-out mania and was hospitalized in restraints.

Did anything trigger the insomnia? “Not really,” Steve says calmly, sitting in his chair.

His mother overhears this from the kitchen and comes into the living room. “His sergeant had called saying that the unit was looking for volunteers to go back to Iraq,” Cindy Justi says. “This is what triggered his snap.”…

He was on the ward for the sixth time when he was notified that he was being discharged from the Army, with only a few days to clear out and a disability rating of zero percent.

On some level, Steve expected the zero rating. During his senior year of college, he suffered a nervous breakdown and for several months was treated with antidepressants. He disclosed this to the National Guard recruiter, who said it was a nonissue. It became an issue when he told doctors at Walter Reed. The Army decided that his condition was not aggravated by his time in Iraq. The only help he would get would come from Veterans Affairs.

“We have no idea if what he endured over there had a worsening effect on him,” says his mother.

His father gets home from the office. Ron Justi sits on the couch across from his son. “He was okay to sacrifice his body, but now that it’s time he needs some help, they are not here,” Ron says.


Follow me on Twitter: @aravosis | @americablog | @americabloggay | Facebook | Google+ | LinkedIn. John Aravosis is the editor of AMERICAblog, which he founded in 2004. He has a joint law degree (JD) and masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown (1989); and worked in the US Senate, World Bank, Children's Defense Fund, and as a stringer for the Economist. Frequent TV pundit: O'Reilly Factor, Hardball, World News Tonight, Nightline & Reliable Sources. Bio, .

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